Chronic Pain or Illness

Living with chronic pain or long-term illness can be devastating and often brings up feelings of grief, fear, sadness or anger. Sometimes just getting a diagnosis can be difficult and navigating treatment options can be overwhelming and exhausting. Depression is one of the most common mental health problems facing people with chronic pain. Whether you are struggling to accept a recent diagnosis or you’ve been experiencing chronic pain for some time, a mental health expert can help. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s specialists today.

Need help finding the right therapist?
Find Your Match

Meet the specialists

 

I have extensive experience working with individuals who live with chronic, complex medical conditions. I completed my postdoctoral training at a medical center where I worked closely with patients in addition to training and supervising psychology doctoral students in a Behavioral Medicine program. I use mindfulness-based interventions and strategies to help those live rich, meaningful lives despite

— Katherine Plambeck, Clinical Psychologist in Berkeley, CA

I work with people who are chronically ill or have pain and disability. I work from a grief model to help you grieve the "should be" in your life. I can understand that it is incredibly lonely and sad to have to grieve yourself. I am chronically ill myself and understand the ups and down's that you experience. I use EMDR to process the trauma of being chronically ill and navigate the medical and mental health system that is not set up to support success.

— Rachelle Friedman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker
 

Chronic health issues are not just challenging physically-they take an emotional toll. Chronic pain and chronic illness can increase feelings of anxiety about the future and feelings of isolation. Therapeutic techniques included Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy can provide interventions to decrease overwhelming feelings of depression and anxiety as well as mindfulness skills to better manage pain flare ups.

— Kelsey Bates, Licensed Professional Counselor in Arlington, VA

I have worked as a medical social worker in long term care settings, provided in-home mental health counseling to individuals and worked in hospice and palliative care providing counseling to both the patient and their family. Facing a health crisis and living with chronic illness can force you to make a lot of decisions and your resources and support may be limited. You might feel overwhelmed and paralyzed. I can help assess what you need, navigate and access support and resources in CO.

— Tanya Witman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Colorado Springs, CO
 

Managing longstanding medical concerns and rehabilitation is draining. I have worked for years with people who manage major illnesses such as diabetes, multiple sclerosis or have history of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) or stroke. Through my work in hospitals and on multidisciplinary teams I have the knowledge and experience to support you as you manage your pain/illness and traversing medical care with providers that often overlook, underappreciate the emotional toll recovery takes.

— K Wortman, Clinical Psychologist in Oakland, CA

I identify as a chronically ill person and I understand how difficult the day to day can be while dealing with chronic pain or a chronic illness. as a therapist, I am here to support you with all of the ins and outs of managing chronic illness or chronic pain. I hope to be a flexible, compassionate and nourishing source of guidance and support for you in this struggle.

— Talia Chanoff, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in ,
 

Working in the Spoonie community is one that has come from continuing to deconstruct the divide between mental and physical health. They interact and effect each other, every time. We also see chronic pain stem from trauma. Each person is different, here we could be addressing trauma or we could be learning to cope with the emotions that come from managing chronic pain or illness.

— Adalyn Wilson, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Supervisor

After years of working with clients who have health-related issues, I myself acquired chronic health conditions that impact my day-to-day life. I both personally and professionally understand what it is like to adjust to these life changes, learn your limitations, pace yourself, and try to raise a family while chronically ill. Preferred issues to address: Fibromyalgia, Food Allergies/Anaphylaxis, Headache, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, IBD (Crohn's/Colitis), Infertility, ME/CFS, Migraine.

— Lori Bolnick, Clinical Psychologist in Schaumburg, IL
 

I identify as a chronically ill person and I understand how difficult the day to day can be while dealing with chronic pain or a chronic illness. as a therapist, I am here to support you with all of the ins and outs of managing chronic illness or chronic pain. I hope to be a flexible, compassionate and nourishing source of guidance and support for you in this struggle.

— Talia Chanoff, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in ,

I identify as a chronically ill person and I understand how difficult the day to day can be while dealing with chronic pain or a chronic illness. as a therapist, I am here to support you with all of the ins and outs of managing chronic illness or chronic pain. I hope to be a flexible, compassionate and nourishing source of guidance and support for you in this struggle.

— Talia Chanoff, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in ,
 

In my own life, I have struggled with 14 years' worth of biotoxin illness that compromised my performance at every level. I understand how hard it is to function amidst lack of compassion & understanding for chronic illness. Everything is a challenge. Cooking, cleaning, organization, focus, memory... No energy for basics, no stamina to do enjoyable things, constant confrontation with grief & death. Constant overwhelm. So much time spent just on survival! I get it... Support helps.

— Jen-Mitsuke Peters, Mental Health Counselor in Denver, CO

Are you living with a chronic illness or endless enduring pain? have you just received a new diagnosis for a illness you are trying to wrap your head aroud? I love to talk with folks about their feelings around illness.

— Michelle Desmond, Clinical Social Worker
 

In therapy, we can explore the many issues that accompany the experience of chronic pain or illness - thought patterns, core beliefs, emotional experience, adjustment and acceptance to your condition, impacts on relationships and functioning, and anything else that arises for you. I have completed and continue to pursue trainings focused on CBT, mindfulness, and yoga practices specifically for chronic pain and illness.

— Joyce Hones, Mental Health Counselor in Asheville, NC

Did you know that research shows therapy for chronic pain is as effective as painkillers? You can have much more influence over your pain than you'd imagine and you can get back to living a full life. Like pain medications, therapy works on the physical body but it also addresses two areas that medications don't. Whether you are dealing with chronic pain or chronic illness, you and I will work together to find solutions so you can focus on living a vibrant, satisfying life.

— Alicia Polk, Licensed Professional Counselor in Belton, MO
 

At least 10% of people with mild acute Covid infection are now thought to fail to make a full recovery from their symptoms and return to their pre-existing level of functioning. Long haulers as they have been colloquially named by the peer community in the US refer to the multi symptom, multi system post viral syndrome. As a former long hauler myself, now mostly recovered, I am working with those who have not in my practice.

— Sally E. Riggs, Psychologist in New York, NY

Psychotherapy with clinical hypnosis has been shown to be effective for treating chronic pain to decrease the intensity of pain and how it may interfere with your life. My VA Hospital research Treating Chronic Low Back Pain with Hypnosis or Biofeedback is published. Clinical hypnosis has also been shown to be very effective for treating Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS).

— Tenley Fukui, Counselor in Houston, TX
 

I have a deep understanding and a great deal of empathy for people who live with ongoing physical pain, chronic illness or a disability. Due to my own experience with these conditions, I know how challenging they are to deal with every day. Therapy with me can help you develop more patience and compassion for yourself and your condition, be realistic and accepting about what you can and can't do and have a calmer, more peaceful mind.

— Christina Hom, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor

I identify as a chronically ill person and I understand how difficult the day to day can be while dealing with chronic pain or a chronic illness. As a therapist, I am here to support you with all of the ins and outs of managing chronic illness or chronic pain and the emotional suffering that can arise. I hope to be a flexible, compassionate and nourishing source of guidance and support for you in this struggle.

— Talia Chanoff, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in ,
 

I spent almost an entire decade shuttered away, homebound with severe fibromyalgia. The agony was constant and there was little relief. Many people did not believe it was a real chronic illness. Now there are millions of people who suffer from Covid-19 Long-Haulers Syndrome, a painful result of contracting the virus (even it was mild at the onset), that can lead to prolonged pain and grounding fatigue. I used my methodology to relieve my pain and get me back to my nearly-best self.

— Anne Graham, Marriage & Family Therapist in Overland Park, KS

Living with chronic illness or traumatic stress, one might feel overwhelmed and tense on a regular basis or trend more toward feeling numb and shut down, perhaps even dissociated, but regardless of how one's experiences show up in their bodies, one thing remains the same: Being “inside ourselves,” with our thoughts, feelings and emotions, feels scary, confusing and painful. Purposefully creating a sense of safety inside ourselves after trauma, illness or crisis can be likened to returning home.

— Jennifer McCombs, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Reno, NV