Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a classic talk therapy technique that helps increase awareness of negative thinking in order to better handle challenging situations. In addition to helping those with mental health disorders (such as anxiety or depression), CBT is also helpful for anyone who is looking to learn how to manage stressful situations. Therapists that use CBT often have a structured program, which involves a set number of sessions. CBT is frequently paired with other treatments, such as medication, when necessary. Think this approach may be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s CBT experts today.

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We all need practical skills to use when we experience symptoms that impact our lives. CBT is great because we can learn about and practice these skills in session. My clients can then feel empowered to apply what they've learned to real-life situations; identifying a thought that then triggers an emotional reaction--plus learning behavioral activation in order to make a change and start feeling better overall.

— Jacqueline Siempelkamp, Licensed Professional Counselor in Radnor, PA

I incorporate Mindfulness-Based CBT and dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) techniques to assist in managing distress on an individual level. For example, we can examine and develop your skills in the areas of assertiveness, present-focused, boundary-setting, balanced thinking, relationship skills, emotion regulation, and distress tolerance.

— Michael Johnson, Psychologist in Gilbert, AZ
 

I incorporate CBT and dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) techniques to assist in managing distress on an individual level. For example, we can examine and develop your skills in the areas of assertiveness, boundary-setting, balanced thinking, relationship skills, emotion regulation, and distress tolerance.

— Michael Johnson, Psychologist in Gilbert, AZ

Expand understanding of the relationship between thoughts, emotions, and actions. Identify internal and external triggers. Establish coping skills.

— Kelly Borich, Social Worker in Bethlehem, PA
 

CBT involves behavioral and cognitive strategies to help you think and act differently. Many of these techniques are straight-forward and easy for you to apply to different situations. With CBT, we have the option to learn new skills (e.g., assertiveness) and be scientific and curious with different strategies.

— Mae MacIntire, Psychologist in Grand Junction, CO

I am trained in exposure therapy as well as schema therapy. These approaches really help a person to understand the relationship between their thoughts and behaviors and looking at creating shifts in thinking and behavior in order to create changes in ones life. This is especially helpful when addressing anxiety, depression and OCD.

— Chaya Bleend, Clinical Social Worker
 

CBT is my go-to gold standard for therapy, because in my experience, it produces results. It actually allows you to change the way you think about yourself and the world (brains are so cool that they can do this!)

— Jenny Shully, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Napa, CA

At the core of CBT therapy is the idea that thoughts, feelings, and behavior are interrelated and making changes in one area can affect the other areas. I frequently use CBT interventions (along with DBT and ACT) to build self-awareness, identify opportunities for change, and support you in developing more helpful and effective coping skills.

— Jeanine Moreland, Clinical Psychologist in Chicago, IL
 

CBT focuses on challenging and changing cognitive distortions and behaviors, improving emotional regulation, and the development of personal coping strategies that target solving current problems.

— Adriana Beck, Licensed Professional Counselor in Plano, TX

Our thoughts lead to emotions. We are not helpless victims to our emotions. Yes, some are wired to just be more emotional, depressed, or anxious. But as rational intelligent humans, we have more power in us than we realize. We all have numerous, and often conflicting different voices in our head. However, we are not often fully aware of all of our automatic thoughts and assumptions that end up guiding our emotions in a negative manner. A therapist can help uncover these thoughts.

— Monte Miller, Psychologist in Austin, TX
 

Cognitive behavioral therapy techniques are used to identify maladaptive behaviors and thoughts that influence your feelings. I use these techniques to redefine our internal thought process and create ways you want to think and understand yourself n

— Kieran Mcmonagle, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Bainbridge Island, WA

I treat most diagnoses via CBT.

— Stephanie Rivera-Velazquez, Therapist
 

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a psycho-social intervention that aims to improve mental health. CBT focuses on challenging and changing cognitive distortions (e.g. thoughts, beliefs, and attitudes) and behaviors, improving emotional regulation, and the development of personal coping strategies that target solving current problems. (Wikipedia)

— Jessica VerBout, Marriage & Family Therapist in Minnetonka, MN

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, or CBT, is grounded in the belief that it is a person’s perception of events – rather than the events themselves – that determines how he or she will feel and act in response. A person’s perception of an event if often based upon beliefs shaped by prior experience, assumptions, and styles of thinking that may alter distort their perception.

— Steve Maurno, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portsmouth, VA
 

I have been working from a CBT perspective for over ten years. My clinical supervision was from a cognitive behavioral therapy clinician and have over three years of intense learning to use CBT. I don't generally use worksheets, but I do challenge negative thinking and thought patterns and use logic during sessions to suss out cognitive behavioral patterns to solicit change in my clients.

— Katie Leikam, Clinical Social Worker in Decatur, GA

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a type of structured psychotherapy that’s backed by studies showing its effectiveness for treating many psychological disorders. Dr. Payam Kharazi has extensive experience using several types of CBT to create individualized therapy that meets each person’s unique goals.

— Payam Kharazi, Psychologist in Beverly Hills, CA