Collaborative Couple Therapy

Collaborative couple therapy is a therapeutic technique that helps couples understand how they communicate when struggling with an issue or argument. The focus of collaborative couple therapy is teaching partners how to turn those fights into intimate conversations, and in turn, strengthen the relationship. In collaborative couple therapy, the therapist will sit in between the couple and speak as if they were one of the partners talking to the other. If one of the partners is 'fighting' by using stinging words, the therapist will attempt to translate those comments into confiding thoughts. If a partner is ‘withdrawing,’ the therapist will guess at what the individual is feeling, and ask if the guesses are correct. A successful outcome of collaborative couple therapy is experiencing intimacy in times of struggle, rather than fighting or withdrawing. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s collaborative couple therapy experts today. 

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Problems tend to form through miscommunication. The collaborative approach helps everyone feel heard and understood. As a result, communication begins to improve, and problems start to dissolve.

— Katherine Traxler, Marriage and Family Therapist Associate

A large majority of my client base is couples. I am currently working as a marriage therapist at The Relationship Institute in Royal Oak, Michigan.

— Leticia Berg, Psychotherapist in Ann Arbor, MI
 

In collaborative couple therapy, partners are encouraged to identify and express their “leading-edge” thoughts and feelings—the ones in the moment that motivate, distract, or linger in the mind or body.Then, they learn how to avoid cyclical fights and be better to each other, and communicate better.

— Christian Longue, Counselor in Austin, TX

I routinely saw couples during my postdoctoral training in sex therapy, and continue to work with couples wishing to enhance intimacy and connection inside and outside of the bedroom. Some common topics I work with couples on include repair from boundary violations (eg, infidelity), setting new boundaries, navigating conflict, developing empathy for one another, and recognizing when old/harmful relational patterns are surfacing in present relationships.

— Alex Tatum, Sex Therapist in Chicago, IL
 

We as individuals form our unique worldviews by the attachment styles we develop with our parents, by the dynamics of our family relationships, friendships, and romantic partnerships throughout our lives. I work collaboratively in partnership with you, honoring your worldview, to recognize what’s going well in your family or couple dynamic, explore where and how you and your relationships can grow, and assisting you increase connection with your loved ones.

— Shelly Hogan, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX

I assist couples to express their thoughts, feelings, and perspectives to each other in a healthy way. I assist couples in learning healthier communication styles and healthier behaviors for themselves and towards each other. I help them identify negative patterns and the root of them so they can be replaced with healthier patterns. I teach couples how to deal with their own thoughts and feelings so they are not taking them out of their partner. We focus on positives of partner and relationship.

— Michelle Brody, Counselor in Windermere, FL
 

I have focused on helping couples shift from an adversarial or withdrawn pattern of relationships to a more collaborative one.

— Dr. Sigal Levy, Psychologist in Fort Lauderdale, FL

Collaborative couple therapy will provide an active, results-oriented and usually brief approach to help couples address issues such as: gridlocked conflict, intimacy, separation and divorce, infertility, relationships with extended family, parenting, and remarriage.

— JINAL MEHTA, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in NEW HYDE PARK, NY
 

Through an active role, I tackle ways of communication between partners and begin to deconstructed the language and meaning behind every interaction. From a simple argument, to better understanding what and why they said what they said.

— Jacqueline House, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Katy, TX