Nonviolent Communication

Nonviolent communication was developed out of a belief that our culture has taught us to think and speak in ways that can actually perpetuate conflict, internal pain and even violence. Nonviolent communication is founded on the tenet that all human beings have the capacity for compassion and only resort to violence or behavior that harms themselves and others when they do not recognize more effective strategies for meeting needs. It is typically taught, often in a therapy session, as a process of interpersonal communication designed to improve compassion for, and connection to, others. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s nonviolent communication specialists today. 

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NVC is the practice of making an observation, expressing a feeling, then a need and making a request. Using NVC takes the charge out of communication which can be so painful and threatening to the survival of the relationship. It allows people to take ownership of their experience and not direct their feelings towards others, which usually only escalates conflict and leads to breakdowns. Utilizing NVC makes hearing one another much easier by staying calm & cool.

— Annette Barnett, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Saratoga, CA

Do you want to resolve conflicts - with yourself and others - in ways that honor your deepest needs? Do you want solutions that work for you and also meet the needs of others? Nonviolent Communication is about how to make that happen. It's about creating the kind of relationship that helps to meet, or at least honor, everyone's needs. It doesn't always get us what we want, but it greatly increases the chances of truly satisfying our underlying needs.

— Carlyle Stewart, Counselor in Asheville, NC
 

NVC is the practice of making an observation, expressing a feeling, then a need and making a request. Using NVC takes the charge out of communication which can be so painful and threatening to the survival of the relationship. It allows people to take ownership of their experience and not direct their feelings towards others, which usually only escalates conflict and leads to breakdowns. Utilizing NVC makes hearing one another much easier by staying calm & cool.

— Annette Barnett, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Saratoga, CA

I have found nonviolent communication to be extremely helpful in clearer and more accurate expression. Additionally, the use of nonviolent communication bypasses many of the standard miscommunications and perceived offenses of standard conversation, facilitating information flow without argument. Interestingly, the use of nonviolent communication may also make the speaker appear more charismatic and persuasive.

— Erica Rampelberg, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Delaware, OH
 

Most of us have been taught to communicate passively, critically, or manipulatively––and that’s so normal to us that we don’t even realize we’re doing it. That is, until we find ourselves feeling powerless to get our needs met, repeating the same conflicts with those we love, and feeling alone or trapped in our relationships. The nonviolent framework provides a systematic approach by teaching us to be present to our own needs, feelings, and requests without blaming others or internalizing shame.

— Alexa Golding, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Nonviolent communication helps to communicate from a place of compassion and empathy to share thoughts, feelings, basic human needs, self-responsibility, and the desire for connection.

— Monique Jessie, Mental Health Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Using the Marshall Rosenberg model of NVC, I assist Clients with affective communication. Using "I" statements and having a relationship with their own feelings helps Clients to understand themselves and this helps them to convey their honest truth in a non-threatening manner.

— Sandra Fitting, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Geronimo, CA

If you have struggles communicating with your family, friends, spouse, boyfriend/girlfriend, boss, teacher, neighbor, etc. you will benefit from learning nonviolent communication (NVC). NVC is being used around the world to aid in communication and to decrease conflict. NVC is composed of four parts: observations, feelings, needs, requests. When you focus on your own experience, the receiver hears the message without blame or criticism (and are less likely to become defensive).

— Jillian Breuninger, Licensed Professional Counselor
 

I use Non-violent Communication (NVC) in my life both personally and professionally because it's such a direct way to speak to our feelings and needs while respecting ourselves and the person we're communicating with. I find it's most helpful as a tool when people are just beginning to speak more kindly to themselves and meet their needs. NVC is great for improving your self-talk, not just how you communicate with others!

— Elissa Burdick, Therapist in ,

I have been trained in academic as well as professional settings in Non-Violent Communication. With such training, I offer to examine, reframe and shift your communication patterns. Even when not communicating with others, what we say to ourselves matters equally. What we say to our own selves also impacts how we view and treat others. I invite you to this space, in which we rewire language to fit our needs. NVC is for couples, families and individuals alike!

— Erica Salazar, Licensed Clinical Social Worker
 

I was introduced to Nonviolent Communication as an undergraduate student. I have been utilizing its principles and literature for over 15 years.

— Steven Fields, Sex Therapist in Hampton, VA

The work of Marshall Rosenbaum has been instrumental in forming my practice. The strategies outlined by this practice are useful in working with families and couples. NVC helps people own their own emotions, not those of others.

— Mark Best, Clinical Social Worker in Vancouver, WA