Nonviolent Communication

Nonviolent communication was developed out of a belief that our culture has taught us to think and speak in ways that can actually perpetuate conflict, internal pain and even violence. Nonviolent communication is founded on the tenet that all human beings have the capacity for compassion and only resort to violence or behavior that harms themselves and others when they do not recognize more effective strategies for meeting needs. It is typically taught, often in a therapy session, as a process of interpersonal communication designed to improve compassion for, and connection to, others. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s nonviolent communication specialists today. 

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NVC is the practice of making an observation, expressing a feeling, then a need and making a request. Using NVC takes the charge out of communication which can be so painful and threatening to the survival of the relationship. It allows people to take ownership of their experience and not direct their feelings towards others, which usually only escalates conflict and leads to breakdowns. Utilizing NVC makes hearing one another much easier by staying calm & cool.

— Annette Barnett, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Saratoga, CA

I was introduced to Nonviolent Communication as an undergraduate student. I have been utilizing its principles and literature for over 15 years.

— Steven Fields, Sex Therapist in Hampton, VA
 

Do you want to resolve conflicts - with yourself and others - in ways that honor your deepest needs? Do you want solutions that work for you and also meet the needs of others? Nonviolent Communication is about how to make that happen. It's about creating the kind of relationship that helps to meet, or at least honor, everyone's needs. It doesn't always get us what we want, but it greatly increases the chances of truly satisfying our underlying needs.

— Carlyle Stewart, Counselor in Asheville, NC

NVC is the practice of making an observation, expressing a feeling, then a need and making a request. Using NVC takes the charge out of communication which can be so painful and threatening to the survival of the relationship. It allows people to take ownership of their experience and not direct their feelings towards others, which usually only escalates conflict and leads to breakdowns. Utilizing NVC makes hearing one another much easier by staying calm & cool.

— Annette Barnett, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Saratoga, CA
 

Compassion is key to our work together, as is developing an awareness of your worth and your values. In a relationship with others, NVC helps us recognize that we are all autonomous beings and effective, clear communication is key to getting our needs met. It removes the "good" and "bad" labels we may impose on things and instead encourages us to be curious and nonjudgmental. It's quite liberating!

— Shelby Dwyer, Counselor in Boston, MA

Nonviolent Communication (aka NVC or Compassionate Communication) is a unique and powerful process for inspiring connection and action with others. Communication is the backbone of human relationships, even the relationship with ourselves. As a therapist trained in NVC, I help my clients learn compassionate, clear, communication skills that can contribute to their well-being, empowerment, and connection in every area of their lives.

— Elise Fabricant, Licensed Professional Counselor Candidate
 

I was introduced to Nonviolent Communication (NVC) about 17 years ago and have been drawing upon the practice ever since. NVC is a way of viewing one's self, one another and the world with empathy--truly listening with an open heart. I am inspired by NVC's stance that humans share common needs. In my work, I listen for those needs; to be understood, to have choice, or be considered, to name a few.

— Ashley Gregory, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in ,

I enjoy teaching Nonviolent Communication (NVC) to families and individuals as a framework for difficult, emotion-heavy conversations. I find that it reduces conflicts and makes it easier to discuss tough topics.

— Josh Powell, Licensed Clinical Social Worker - Candidate
 

Nonviolent Communication (NVC) is a wonderful technique for helping you connect to your own feelings and needs, and figure out ways to work through conflicts with others in a clear and compassionate way.

— Deborah Ranker, Clinical Social Worker in Portland, OR

I was trained in NVC and have used it with clients since 2009.

— Amelia McGinley, Clinical Social Worker in St. Paul, MN
 

Learning to identify, express, and share our feelings and needs can change both how we relate to ourselves and to others. When we don't know how we are feeling, how can someone comfort or reassure us? Together we find a way for you to not only know what you feel and need but also to trust in yourself enough to ask for it from your family, partner, and the world.

— Elizabeth McGinnis, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Menlo Park, CA