Pregnancy and Postpartum

Like almost everything else in your life, your body and mind will face significant changes in the weeks and months before and after your baby's birth. While many women experience some mild mood changes during or after the birth of a child, 15 to 20% of women experience more significant symptoms of depression or anxiety. Symptoms, which may include feelings of sadness, hopelessness, or anger, trouble eating or sleeping, difficulty bonding with your baby, panic, upsetting thoughts, or a fear you may hurt yourself or your baby, can appear any time during pregnancy and during the first 12 months after childbirth. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, or even just a general sense of being “out of control” or “going crazy”, a qualified mental health professional can help. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s pregnancy and postpartum specialists today.

Need help finding the right therapist?
Find Your Match

Meet the specialists

 

I am the mother of a former extreme preemie and have personal insight into the trauma of the NICU experience that can impact parents and families long after their little one is discharged from the hospital. Having experienced my own journey towards healing, I am here to help you process the feelings of loss, guilt, anxiety and depression as you learn to navigate a path that is very different from what you expected.

— Hope Flores, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist

During pregnancy, I can support you with preparing for birth and postpartum, processing your childhood experiences that are coming up as you prepare to become a parent, addressing anxiety or fear about what comes next, and navigating sexual changes. Postpartum support may include processing the identity shift you're experiencing, processing your birth or birth trauma, navigating feeding challenges, or addressing postpartum anxiety or depression.

— Eva Firth, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Portland, OR
 

I have extensive training in Maternal Mental Health issues. I have earned the Perinatal Mental Health Certificate with Postpartum Support International. I use Mindfulness, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Interpersonal Therapy, ad Acceptance Commitment Therapy interventions to help you heal and begin to feel stable and happier during this transition of your life.

— Katie LCSW, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

Not everyone feels great and excited during pregnancy. It can be overwhelming and scary. And almost every new mom I've treated for postpartum depression or anxiety (or OCD) has questioned why no one tells about feeding issues, lack of sleep, profound change of daily experience and personal identity, marital strains, baby blues, feeling overwhelmed by the scope of responsibility, not knowing the "right" thing to do. I have extensive experience helping new moms weather this challenging adjustment.

— Ellen Recker, Psychotherapist in New York, NY
 

Not everyone feels great during pregnancy, or immediately loves their child ... it can be overwhelming! Every new mom I've treated for postpartum depression or anxiety (or OCD) has questioned why no one tells them about feeding issues, lack of sleep, missing their old life, marital strains, baby blues, feeling overwhelmed, not knowing the "right" thing to do. I have extensive experience helping new moms (and dads) weather this challenging time and enjoy their new role as a mom (or dad).

— Ellen Recker, Psychotherapist in New York, NY

Pregnancy and postpartum can bring intense emotional shifts. I help couples and individuals who are experiencing difficulties through these major life transitions.

— Angela Allan, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Oakland, CA
 

I see the challenges and sacredness of pregnancy and postpartum time periods in a person's life. This time is not to be taken lightly, and I believe pregnant and postpartum people do not get the emotional, physical, and medical support they need. Therapy is one way to attain some of that much needed support and care.

— Alexandra Klein, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Greenwood Village, CO

I'm an advanced maternal mental health & Perinatal Mental Health-Certified specialist (in process). I participate in regular ongoing training in evidence-based perinatal treatment & research to support my practice with this population. This includes specialized training in support & interventions for women in all stages of perinatal mental health (i.e., fertility, pregnancy, postpartum, miscarriage/still birth, infertility, pregnancy termination, etc).

— Keely Clark, Clinical Social Worker
 

When I first saw postpartum depression, I didn’t know it. I had been all about resilience beginning in the womb until I saw her ashamed, sobbing on a pile of 5-steps-to-perfect-mothering books. I hid her books & held her & the baby. It was all I knew to do. I became certified in treating prenatal & postpartum mood disorders because I realized people can't grow resilient babies without support for their own flourishing. I now help people become safe, seen, & supported in birth & beyond.

— Sarah Kendrick, Mental Health Counselor in Portland, OR

I am Perinatal Mood Health-Certified (PMH-C) by Postpartum Support International (PSI).

— M. Cecilia Bocanegra, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Evanston, IL
 

You’ve got a little one now. Congratulations! This new season of life is full of complex feelings of joy, fear and loss. Perhaps, life post partum just isn’t what you thought it would be. Maybe your past childhood trauma (that you worked so hard on in therapy) has popped back up again in light of now being a parent yourself. Having a space to be honest about these feelings and experiences can help you be the parent you want to be.

— Courtney Burns, Therapist in Portland, OR

Having a baby be incredibly hard when things don't go as expected. I specialize in perinatal mental health, helping birthing people take care of their emotional and psychological well-being before, during and after pregnancy. If you've had a difficult pregnancy or childbirth, faced infertility or loss/pregnancy loss, you may be coping with challenges you couldn't have predicted. You're not alone and you deserve support.

— Holly Evans, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in South Pasadena, CA
 

I myself have been trough the transition to motherhood, 2x. The adjustment is a wild one. I sought specific training in this arena with Post Partum Support International, to help other women and families through this period of time. I have a deep knowledge that you are not the same person on the other side of this transition, much like a caterpillar into a butterfly! My personal experience and professional training can assist you in preparing and moving through pregnancy and postpartum.

— Jeralyn Giffen, Therapist in , OH

Cognitive behavior therapy is an evidence based therapy that is very helpful navigating perinatal anxiety and postpartum depression. Individual therapy or therapy groups are offered to help provide new tools, support and a space to process your major life transition and change of identity into motherhood.

— Kelsey Bates, Licensed Professional Counselor in Arlington, VA
 

I have extensive experience supporting parents, expecting parents, and grieving parents during this unique period of life. I have advanced training in the treatment of Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorders through Postpartum Support International and completed subspecialty training in Infant/Early Childhood Mental Health at University of Denver. I wrote my dissertation on the body image concerns that often arise during the perinatal period. I have trained in OB/GYN, NICU, and community clinics.

— Maria Canyon, PsyD, Clinical Psychologist in Denver, CO

With 7 years of experience as a birth, fertility, and parenthood doula I have such excitement for this life transition. It holds such potential for growth and change both for the individuals involved but also for the lineages that are coming next.

— Angharad Hollingworth, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist
 

It's really called Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorder and not postpartum depression. That's because depression is not the only issue. There is anxiety, and a few other mood disorders that can be a part of a troubled perinatal period. You can be assisted with assessment tools, guidance and support. You and your baby can be just fine if you go for the help you need during this time. Include your core support group if you like because support is excellent.

— Antonia Allison, Marriage & Family Therapist in Diamond Bar, CA

Not everyone feels great and excited during pregnancy. It can be overwhelming and scary. And almost every new mom I've treated for postpartum depression or anxiety (or OCD) has questioned why no one tells about: feeding issues, lack of sleep, profound change of daily experience and personal identity, marital strains, baby blues, feeling overwhelmed by the scope of responsibility, not knowing the "right" thing to do. I have extensive experience helping newmoms weather this challenging adjustment.

— Ellen Recker, Psychotherapist in New York, NY