Pregnancy and Postpartum

Like almost everything else in your life, your body and mind will face significant changes in the weeks and months before and after your baby's birth. While many women experience some mild mood changes during or after the birth of a child, 15 to 20% of women experience more significant symptoms of depression or anxiety. Symptoms, which may include feelings of sadness, hopelessness, or anger, trouble eating or sleeping, difficulty bonding with your baby, panic, upsetting thoughts, or a fear you may hurt yourself or your baby, can appear any time during pregnancy and during the first 12 months after childbirth. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, or even just a general sense of being “out of control” or “going crazy”, a qualified mental health professional can help. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s pregnancy and postpartum specialists today.

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Meet the specialists

 

I have completed Basic & Advanced trainings through Postpartum Support International (PSI) that focus on Perinatal Mental Health. “Perinatal” refers to the period of trying to conceive, active pregnancy, and post-birth up to one year. I will soon be nationally certified via exam.

— Jessica Bertolino, Licensed Professional Counselor

Pregnancy and the postpartum period are a unique season of life that require specialized training and experience from a qualified provider. Together, we can address concerns that may arise and help you identify and strengthen the supports you need.

— Jessica Reynoso, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Gilbert, AZ
 

I have specialized training in treating women with perinatal and postpartum mood and anxiety disorders. Additionally I am a trained Bringing Baby Home facilitator, a program that helps couples navigate the transition from being a couple to being a family. In my private practice I work with parents at all stages of parenting; from new born to adult children. I have found that each stage of parenting presents its own unique challenges and I have a soft place in my heart for parents and the struggles they go through as they guide their children through life.

— Gwendolyn Nelson-Terry, Marriage & Family Therapist in Berkeley, CA

Pregnancy and the postpartum period can put you through an emotional rollercoaster. Whether it's your first child or your eighth, I can help you sort through those feelings.

— Snehal Kanitkar, Associate Professional Counselor in Allen, TX
 

Whether you are contemplating parenthood, hoping to conceive, just found out you are expecting, or already brought your baby home, I can help you navigate the next phase of your life.

— Cyla Fisk, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Pasadena, CA

Not everyone feels great during pregnancy, or immediately loves their child ... it can be overwhelming! Every new mom I've treated for postpartum depression or anxiety (or OCD) has questioned why no one tells them about feeding issues, lack of sleep, missing their old life, marital strains, baby blues, feeling overwhelmed, not knowing the "right" thing to do. I have extensive experience helping new moms (and dads) weather this challenging time and enjoy their new role as a mom (or dad).

— Ellen Recker, Psychotherapist in New York, NY
 

I have specialized training In Perinatal Mood Disorders through Postpartum Support International.

— Tameka Whittlesey, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Charlotte, NC

One of my passions is in supporting birthing people. Our social structures are not set up to provide enough support during such a beautiful and messy, challenging time. I'd love to be there for you, as a judgment-free place to bring all of your experiences during this life transition. Maybe you're a surrogate who gestated a pregnancy, maybe you're a gender non-conforming person who is carrying, or maybe you're a partner of someone who just gave birth and need support too.

— Gianna Rico, Clinical Social Worker in Baltimore, MD
 

I see the challenges and sacredness of pregnancy and postpartum time periods in a person's life. This time is not to be taken lightly, and I believe pregnant and postpartum people do not get the emotional, physical, and medical support they need. Therapy is one way to attain some of that much needed support and care.

— Alexandra Klein, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Greenwood Village, CO

Not everyone feels great and excited during pregnancy. It can be overwhelming and scary. And almost every new mom I've treated for postpartum depression or anxiety (or OCD) has questioned why no one tells about feeding issues, lack of sleep, profound change of daily experience and personal identity, marital strains, baby blues, feeling overwhelmed by the scope of responsibility, not knowing the "right" thing to do. I have extensive experience helping new moms weather this challenging adjustment.

— Ellen Recker, Psychotherapist in New York, NY
 

Not everyone feels great and excited during pregnancy. It can be overwhelming and scary. And almost every new mom I've treated for postpartum depression or anxiety (or OCD) has questioned why no one tells about: feeding issues, lack of sleep, profound change of daily experience and personal identity, marital strains, baby blues, feeling overwhelmed by the scope of responsibility, not knowing the "right" thing to do. I have extensive experience helping newmoms weather this challenging adjustment.

— Ellen Recker, Psychotherapist in New York, NY

Therapy can be a place to figure out how to adjust to parenthood and how to cope with the pressures that come with this new role. It also provides you with a place to get support for what you are going through. I work with men and women who are struggling with this adjustment in a more mild form as well as men and women who are experiencing postpartum mood and anxiety disorders.

— Ginny Kington, Psychologist in Duluth, GA
 

It's really called Perinatal Mood and Anxiety Disorder and not postpartum depression. That's because depression is not the only issue. There is anxiety, and a few other mood disorders that can be a part of a troubled perinatal period. You can be assisted with assessment tools, guidance and support. You and your baby can be just fine if you go for the help you need during this time. Include your core support group if you like because support is excellent.

— Antonia Allison, Marriage & Family Therapist in Diamond Bar, CA

Created the peri-partum support program at Kaiser, working with Ob-gyn to create a safe space for women to process their feeling pre and post childbirth; specialize in processing traumatic births, post party depression and anxiety, as well as miscarriage and loss.

— Lauren Ogren, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Rafael, CA
 

Pregnancy and birth are both important transitions in life. We often feel that no matter how many books we read, we are not prepared for the very real physical, hormonal and emotional changes that take place before and after giving birth. There are so many new experiences and challenges. I offer pre and postnatal counseling to help you navigate this new phase in your life. I also offer in home postpartum therapy for new parents located in Harrison and Jackson Counties in Mississippi.

— Jacalyn Wetzel, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

We treat Perinatal/Postpartum/Maternal OCD, providing moms-to-be and new moms who are suffering with OCD symptoms effective treatment. We offer treatment for both maternal themes, such as an intense fear of harming or contaminating your infant, as well as any other subtype of OCD during pregnancy and postpartum. Should any OCD symptoms persist after the perinatal period, we continue to provide care to our clients throughout the entirety of their OCD treatment journey.

— North Shore OCD Women's Treatment Center, Ltd. Kathi Fine Abitbol, PhD, Clinical Psychologist in Deerfield, IL
 

Trying to add a child to your life doesn't always turn out the way you expected. Sometimes there are struggles with conception, pregnancy complications, or even birth and related challenges. This time in your life can be especially isolating and can increase the stress, grief, and sadness that you experience in your life. Through emotional support, we can help you feel less alone in your experience.

— Dr. Dowtin, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor

If your postpartum recovery has been causing you to feel disconnected, guilty, or isolated: I provide you a safe space as you navigate through your life-change and support you in gaining back your connection with yourself, your spouse, or your child.

— Darcy Pare, Mental Health Counselor
 

I work with mothers and their families who are experiencing adjustment difficulties, may have a perinatal mood disorder, want to prevent postpartum depression and anxiety, struggle with infertility or grief and loss, feel disconnected from their infant, or are overwhelmed with parenting a toddler.

— Dr. Kristin Edwards, Psychologist in Tampa, FL