LGBTQ Issues

Just like any other group, the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and questioning (LGBTQ) community faces mental health issues and unique challenges. However, LGBTQ individuals are almost 3 times more likely than others to experience a mental health condition, such as depression or anxiety. Additionally, more than half of individuals who identify as transgender experience depression or anxiety. The LGBTQ community is also at a higher risk for suicide. Young people are even more at risk, as they may experience a lack of support at home and fear, hatred or prejudice in school. If you are a member of the LGBTQ community and are facing mental health challenges, you don’t have to suffer in silence. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s LGBTQ experts and get help today.

Need help finding the right therapist?
Find Your Match

Meet the specialists

 

Adoptees intersect with LGBTQIA2S+ issues in vast ways. Some of us identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning, intersex, asexual, two-spirit, etc. (LGBTQIA2S+), and some of us may identify as LGBTQIA2S+ and/or have a caregiver(s), parent(s), or sibling(s) who identify as such. Regardless, our experiences as adoptees often interplay with the complexities of gender identity & sexual orientation, and having space to discuss these intersectional identities can be empowering.

— Andrés González, Therapist

I have advanced training and interest in working with LGBTQIA folx. I'm also sex-positive and am poly and ENM affirming and competent.

— Deb Horton, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Deerfield, NH
 

I have extensive training in and personal experience with LGBTQ issues. I have provided cultural competency training to a handful of service organizations and agencies over the years. Currently, I leading a group advocating for LGBTQ resources in rural NE Colorado.

— ShannonElaine John, Counselor in Fort Morgan, CO

I have extensive experience both personally and professionally with the LGBTQIA+ community. I have experience assisting clients process issues including sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, coming out, transgender concerns, gender dysphoria, family dynamics, and oppressive trauma.

— Felicia Keeton-Howard, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in Seattle, WA
 

As a queer person in a straight-passing relationship, I recognize the privilege I bring to the therapy room. I work to continuously develop my knowledge base about both queer issues as well expansive relationships by engaging in continuing education, consultation, & clinical work. I see a large number of LGBTQ folx and and strive to use my privileges to fight against oppressive sociopolitical dynamics.

— Olivia Carollo, Clinical Psychologist in Chicago, IL

I have been an out lesbian since 1986. I worked at Stonewall Recovery Services for the last few years it existed, providing the lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and questioning communities alcohol and drug treatment services in Seattle. I love to work with people who are either wanting someone who needs no explanations when they are talking about their lives as who they are or with those who are still finding their way through all the issues that may come up.

— Deb Dettman, Clinical Social Worker in SEATTLE, WA
 

I have studied extensively LGBTQ concerns, and have written about gay and Trans topics. I create a welcoming space in therapy to address the additional challenges that identifying as a sexual and/or gender minority can bring. Together, we can build more resilience and help you to manage your understandable feelings from the stresses of stigma and micro (and macro) aggressions you face.

— Wayne Bullock, Psychologist in Washington, DC

My master's thesis focused on bisexuality and social stigma, and my doctoral dissertation was the first study of gay affirmative psychotherapy. I also have substantial experience helping lesbian and trans clients and clients who identify as queer.

— Jonathan Lebolt, PhD, Psychotherapist in Bethesda, MD
 

As a member of this community (as with the other communities I serve) I have lived experience of the microaggressions and struggles faced by the LGBTQIA+ or SAGA community when attempting to access mental health care. I provide a sex positive and affirming space to explore all aspects of sexuality, gender, and relationship, but also understand the ways in which simply belonging to this community impacts other aspects of a person's life.

— Farrah Bonnot, Licensed Professional Counselor in Denton, TX

I have taken several trainings on working with members of the LGBTQIA+ community and it is an area of focus that I am passionate about.

— Jennifer Moynihan Wynn, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Raleigh, NC
 

I provide support in coming out, gender and sexuality exploration, and gender affirming care. I have significant experience working with the LGBTQ+ community and specific issues that are commonly linked to folx in the community due to historic and ongoing marginalization, oppression, and violence. I provide letters for gender-affirming surgeries and see my role as supported in discovering the way to best live in community and in your body.

— Natalie Chen, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Sunnyvale, CA

As a member of this community (as with the other communities I serve) I have lived experience of the microaggressions and struggles faced by the LGBTQIA+ or SAGA community when attempting to access mental health care. I provide a sex positive and affirming space to explore all aspects of sexuality, gender, and relationship, but also understand the ways in which simply belonging to this community impacts other aspects of a person's life.

— Farrah Bonnot, Licensed Professional Counselor in Denton, TX
 

Living in a heteronormative world can be exhausting, lonely, and, at times, anxiety-provoking. Being understood and accepted for who you are is essential to your health and well-being. I work with LGBTQ clients to explore their identity, find health coping techniques for managing the stressors of living in a heteronormative world, and cultivate acceptance and affirmation.

— Mae MacIntire, Psychologist in Grand Junction, CO

Although I am an ally, I'm not directly in the LGTBQ community; however I'm incredibly supportive, understanding, and open to all persons, lifestyles, and sexualities. I've had the pleasure of gaining more and more persons that are non-binary / transgender over the years and it seems to be a population that can be benefited from my services.

— Danielle Eaton, Counselor
 

I have years of experience working with LGBTQIA+ individuals in a variety of settings. I am also a member of the community.

— Erin Shapiro, Licensed Professional Counselor in Dallas, TX

Even though we have made some progress with cultural acceptance of diverse sexual and romantic orientations and gender identifications, discrimination, oppression, and marginalization of LGBTQ+ people continue. I am qualified and familiar with the challenges this communinty faces and I believe that's imperative for successful therapy outcomes.

— Roman Haas, Counselor in , CO
 

As a member of this community (as with the other communities I serve) I have lived experience of the microaggressions and struggles faced by the LGBTQIA+ or SAGA community when attempting to access mental health care. I provide a sex positive and affirming space to explore all aspects of sexuality, gender, and relationship, but also understand the ways in which simply belonging to this community impacts other aspects of a person's life.

— Farrah Bonnot, Licensed Professional Counselor in Denton, TX

I work extensively with lesbian and bisexual women, and often with gay men. For many years, I provided supervision for pre-licensed clinicians at Pacific Center in Berkeley and at Queer Life Space in San Francisco. I have a deep understanding of the challenges that can come with seeing the world through an LGBTQQ++ lens.

— Marla Cass, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Mateo, CA
 

I identify as Queer within the LGBTQ community & a driving force of becoming a therapist was about helping others within the community. If you find yourself in need of support while coming out, exploring your sexual or gender identity, navigating relationships (romantic or otherwise), struggling with shifts in your sexuality over time, acceptance, internalized homophobia, or any aspect of being in the LGBTQ community I'd like to help you.

— Jen King, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in , CT