Psychosis and Schizophrenia

The term psychosis covers a set of related conditions, of which schizophrenia is the most common. Psychosis symptoms include hallucinations, delusions (strongly believing things that aren’t true), confusion, racing thoughts, disorganized behavior, and catatonia. In order to receive a diagnosis of schizophrenia, a patient must first exhibit signs of psychosis.  However, schizophrenia often comes with many other symptoms, beyond psychosis, such as a loss of motivation, withdrawing from your life, feeling emotionless or flat, or struggling to complete the basic daily function of life (like showering). If you think you might be suffering from psychosis or schizophrenia, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s experts today.

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I have 6 years of experience working with chronic severe mental illness in both outpatient and inpatient environments using evidence-based therapies. I highly value opportunities for educating folks in recovery about their symptoms, ways of maintaining both physical & emotional wellness, reducing stigma, and instilling the importance of peer connection. I am able to offer support with both sensitivity and compassionate thought challenging.

— Jessica Bertolino, Licensed Professional Counselor

When symptoms, such as hallucinations and delusions, begin we can often recognize them as worrisome and questionable. As time passes, however, locked into this mind space of fearful questioning, these symptoms can progress and overtake in a debilitating way. With medication + therapy, one can learn the skills necessary to process and manage these thoughts and experiences, and with ample support it is completely possible to live a meaningful and fulfilling existence.

— Dr. Dana Avey, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Colorado Springs, CO
 

In my practice I specialize solely in psychosis and clinical high risk for psychosis using an evidence based CBT approach. Labels and specific diagnosis are irrelevant. I take a person centered, truly collaborative approach to help you overcome your distress and achieve your goals.

— Sally E. Riggs, Psychologist in New York, NY
 

Psychosis is a break from reality which can be hard to understand, but I have worked with this population for a long time and I have a great appreciation for thought processes.

— Hava Jarosz, Therapist in Baltimore, MD

I have specialized training in CBT for psychosis and spent a significant portion of my early career in a coordinated specialty care program for first episode psychosis.

— Teresa Thompson, Clinical Social Worker in ,
 

My training in psychosis began in graduate school and extended through my postdoctoral training where I completed a one year program specializing in the treatment of clients experiencing psychotic disorders. Importantly, my training and philosophy emphasizes a recover-oriented model. This means that you will be supported in establishing and achieving goals in your life despite experiencing difficult and distressing symptoms.

— KELLY ANDERSON, Psychologist in SAN DIEGO, CA

I have been working with psychotic spectrum disorders for the past 4 years. I tend to approach these conditions from a holistic platform, tailoring treatment to the client's cultural and personal perspective.

— Rebecca M. Rojas, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Coral Gables, FL
 

I am trained and certified in both the SCID (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders) and the SIPS (Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes) which help to clarify a diagnosis as well as to assess for psychic features that may be indicative of a psychotic disorder. The SCID can help to clarify a diagnosis while the SIPS will help us to hone in on what we call prodomal symptoms. One or both of these may be used in detecting fitness for this treatment.

— Kelly Pickering, Licensed Professional Counselor in bountiful, UT

Sometimes we experience things that might not make sense to other people, or even ourselves. People with psychotic disorders often struggle with things like hearing voices, paranoia, thoughts that get all tangled up and other things that feel so strange. I have worked as part of a first episode psychosis team in the past and have strong training in approaches including CBT for psychosis to help with each of these and get you back to that Recovery from psychosis is 100% possible.

— JENNIFER GERLACH, Therapist in Swansea, IL
 

I have over 10 years of experience providing therapy and case management to people experiencing psychosis (hearing voices, seeing visions, experiencing unusual thoughts). I bring understanding, compassion, and support for how to manage and cope with the distress, confusion, and stigma of this experience.

— Serena Wong, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

I have worked with adults with severe and persistent mental illness for the last six years. The majority of my clients have schizophrenia, schizoaffective, or some sort of psychosis.

— Heather Bell, Clinical Social Worker in Clackamas, OR