Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)

Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) combines aspects of acceptance and mindfulness approaches with behavior-change strategies, in an effort to help clients develop psychological flexibility. Therapists and counselors who employ ACT seek to help clients identify the ways that their efforts to suppress or control emotional experiences can create barriers. When clients are able to identify these challenges, it can be easier to make positive and lasting changes. Think this approach may work for you? Contact one of TherapyDen’s ACT specialists today to try it out.

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ACT uses acceptance and mindfulness strategies mixed in different ways with commitment and behavior-change strategies, to increase psychological flexibility.

— Christina Kafalas, Clinical Social Worker in Tempe, AZ

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy encourages you to embrace your thoughts and feelings instead of rejecting them or feeling guilty for having them. The six principles of this treatment includes: cognitive defusion (seeing thoughts and feelings for what they are instead of identifying with it), expansion and acceptance, connection with the present moment, observing your thoughts and self without judgement, clarification, and committed action to changing your situation. ACT includes mindfulness.

— Feliz Lucia Molina, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Los Angeles, CA
 

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is an evidence-based behavioral therapy that encourages people to embrace their thoughts and feelings, including the negative ones. The goal of ACT is to create a rich and meaningful life by increasing psychological flexibility. ACT combines the mindfulness skill of living in the present moment with the practice of self-acceptance. When we allow our thoughts and feelings to be as they are, even the most painful events can seem more tolerable.

— Carmen F Juneidi, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Chicago, IL

Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is a type of therapy that helps people accept the difficulties they are experiencing as a part of life, identify their values, and take action that aligns with these values. The premise of ACT is that struggle is a part of life, and fighting against it gets us nowhere, and can sometimes make things worse. If we accept the struggles we face but decide to move forward in spite of these struggles, we can achieve our goals and live a life with more meaning and purpose. I incorporate compassion-focused practices into my ACT work, helping you acknowledge the ways in which you are being hard on yourself, and how being a little bit kinder might help you move towards a life of valued action and meaning.

— Ashley Hamm, Licensed Professional Counselor in Houston, TX
 

Nonacceptance of the way things are turns pain into suffering. Accepting that things are the way they are is necessary in order to shift your focus to other things you can do something about. The use of metaphor is helpful in conveying truths about life. Taking a step back and looking at yourself as an outside observer helps you not get caught up in the situation or the emotion. I can help you adopt that observer perspective and find your way to live more mindfully.

— Joanna Morse, Psychologist in Louisville, KY

Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) combines aspects of acceptance and mindfulness approaches with behavior-change strategies, in an effort to help clients develop psychological flexibility

— Patricia Duggan, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Asheville, NC
 

ACT is one of the "Third Wave" CBT practices and incorporates behavioral strategies and mindfulness techniques. These strategies help clients identify their values, better understand what things are getting in the way of their ability to live a life that is congruent with these values, and begin to live a values-oriented life that is rich and vibrant.

— Beth Perlmutter, Clinical Social Worker in Atlanta, GA

After we have experienced intense trauma we think how great it would be if we could go back and somehow change things. But the sad reality is that we can't and because of this we have to accept our past and make the best of the hand we were dealt. Radical acceptance might seem impossible but sometimes it is the only way forward.

— Andrea Rodriguez, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor
 

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy is an action-oriented approach that stems from traditional Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. It utilizes acceptance and mindfulness strategies to help the client accept the difficulties that come with life.

— Paula Kirsch, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in , MI

I work from a model called Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). It’s a very active form of therapy - it’s not just talking about problems, it’s learning skills to handle difficult thoughts and feelings more effectively so they have less impact and influence over you. ACT involves clarifying your values for how you want to treat yourself and others. You use those values to guide your actions so you can solve your problems and face your challenges. In doing so, you learn how to do things that

— Lindsey Gould, Licensed Clinical Social Worker
 

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is an evidence-based therapy that is effective for a variety of issues. ACT is culturally sensitive because it doesn't assume you're the problem, it assumes you have normal human problems. ACT encourages you to connect with yourself, take purposeful action, and maintain focused yet flexible engagement with your life. We aim to achieve tangible results by focusing on what you value, what works, and what moves you forward.

— Nancy Lee, Licensed Professional Counselor in Foxfield, CO

Many studies have shown that cognitive flexibility is strongly linked with emotional well-being. ACT utilizes mindfulness-based strategies to increase flexibility and to reduce suffering.

— Jessica Magenheimer, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , CA
 

I teach mindfulness skills to help you live and behave in ways consistent with your personal values while developing psychological flexibility. I will help you recognize ways in which your attempts to suppress, manage, and control your emotional experiences actually create challenges. By recognizing and addressing these challenges, you can make room for values-based actions that support your goals and well-being.

— Juliet Kinkade-Black, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist

ACT proposes that are so many reasons to be sad and anxious in life. Often when we feel stuck in these emotions, it is because we are trying hard to control how we feel. We can do this by avoiding, drinking, or even just numbing out. The price is disconnection from the things we value most. ACT works through mindfulness to sit with difficult feelings and work toward values-based action to navigate our experiences and reconnect with our passions and purpose.

— Alison Gurley, Clinical Psychologist in New York, NY
 

I have received additional training in ACT therapy and utilize supervision from an ACT therapist for additional support.

— Kiley Ellefson, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern

I am trained in principals of Acceptance and Commitment therapy including values work and committed actions.

— Kyle Woodson, Licensed Professional Counselor in Denver, CO
 

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy is an action-oriented approach that stems from traditional Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. It utilizes acceptance and mindfulness strategies to help the client accept the difficulties that come with life. I highly recommend "The Illustrated Happiness Trap: How to Stop Struggling and Start Living" by Russ Harris. This is a graphic novel illustrating the principles of ACT Therapy, making it easy to understand and implement into your life.

— Paula Kirsch, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in , MI