Attachment

Attachment issues, or attachment disorders, are broad terms used to describe issues resulting from a failure to form normal attachments to primary caregivers in early childhood. Most children with attachment disorders have had severe problems or difficulties in their early relationships (they may have been neglected or physically or emotionally abused). One specific attachment disorder is Reactive attachment disorder (RAD), a condition typically found in children who have received grossly negligent care and do not form a healthy emotional attachment with their primary caregivers (usually their mothers) before age 5. A mental health professional who specializes in attachment issues can be a great help to both the child and the caregiver affected. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s experts today!

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Our attachment anxieties are often triggered in the context of our close romantic relationships and friendships. This can show up as reactivity, overwhelming fears about the relationship, or a habit of shutting down or pulling away. I help my clients to notice their behavioral patterns and overcome unhelpful habits that can create obstacles to connection.

— Kayla Freeman, Social Worker in Austin, TX
 

When it comes to couples counseling, attachment-focused therapy is a game-changer. It recognizes that our emotions are at the heart of our relationships, and that by better understanding and managing our emotions, we can create deeper, more meaningful connections with our partners. ​Couples learn to identify and express their emotional needs and to learn how to respond to their partner's emotional states in a supportive and caring way.

— Marla Mathisen, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in convenient and effective online couples therapy in Austin, Dallas/Ft Worth, Houston, San Antonio, and everywhere across Texas, TX

How we attach to others has to do with who we are attaching to, how we see ourselves and what connection has looked like in the past. We often what to ascribe responsibility to someone for the level of discomfort and hurt that comes as a result of attachment challenges but the work of therapy is to shift from blaming or shaming to a place of care, curiosity and emotional security. Regardless of what causes the attachment wound, each situation is an opportunity for a correct experience.

— Ryan Chambers, Licensed Professional Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

Our most early relationships shape us. How our needs are met, or not, leave an imprint on our sense of self on a deep, non-verbal level. Our attachment styles are formed by 5 years of age, and we develop core survival strategies to get our needs met in relationships, at the expense of oneself. Therapy can help you heal your relationship with yourself, and reimagine how you'd like to be in relationship with those most important to you.

— Kim Torrence, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Rockville, MD

I believe that the early relationships and formative bonds of our childhood impact how we connect now. Together, with non-judgmental curiosity, we will talk about how your stories about attachment effect your relationships with others and your view of yourself

— Alahna Blakeman, Mental Health Practitioner in Brooklyn, NY
 

As social beings, relationships are an inevitable part of our life. This starts from our early relationships with caregivers, to friendships, and to intimate/romantic partners. Often we have a pattern in relationships that is rooted in our experience with caregivers and can also be seen in how we relate to the social world around us. Because relationships are such an integral part of our life, much of my work with clients has been on healthy relationships, secure attachments, and building trust.

— Shamima Akhter, Clinical Psychologist

I believe that attachment is the foundation for all relationships. I help my clients to understand their attachment style and how this may be preventing them from developing healthy relationships and ultimately living the life that they want.

— Kellita Thompson, Marriage & Family Therapist in Brentwood, TN
 

Together we will explore early life experiences to understand more about how you came to be who you are today. The way we attach, or do not attach, to our primary caregivers as a child has a huge impact on our adult relationships. We will identify your personal attachment style, and examine how this plays out in your past and current relationships. We can work together to assist you in developing a healthier attachment style to improve your relationships, and feel more secure in them.

— Jessica Kopp, Licensed Professional Counselor in , PA

When it comes to couples counseling, attachment-focused therapy is a game-changer. It recognizes that our emotions are at the heart of our relationships, and that by better understanding and managing our emotions, we can create deeper, more meaningful connections with our partners. Couples learn to identify and express their emotional needs and to learn how to respond to their partner's emotional states in a supportive and caring way.

— Marla Mathisen, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Convenient and effective online couples therapy in Murray, Park City and across Utah, UT
 

Completed attachment based training, including EFIT and EFT. I believe that most of the symptoms bringing people to therapy are the result of nervous system dysregulation secondary to childhood attachment traumas. Caregivers' inability to attune to a child, lack of modeling of appropriate emotion management, and child's efforts to adjust to their flawed environments, etc. all lead to long term difficulties with navigating interpersonal relationships and sense of internal turmoil.

— Olga Goodman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in El Cajon, CA

My goal is to empower clients to both understand and communicate their needs within their relationships. I focus on attachment experiences, trauma, & family history & how it is observed through communication styles, relational & security needs, etc.

— MacKenzie Knapp, Marriage & Family Therapist in Tacoma, WA
 

Our attachment style begins to develop when we are very young children. Ideally, it is a secure attachment but often due to a variety of reasons it is insecure or even avoidant. This impacts adult relationships in ways that people are often unaware. If you need help understanding yourself in your personal relationships, Jeannette York can help.

— Jeannette York, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Toluca Lake, CA

Conflict in our relationships can create stress and the feeling of being unbalanced. Together we will identify how your attachment style plays a role in your sense of self, so that you can practice how to, communicate your emotions effectively, while building confidence in your ability to be vulnerable.

— Rachel Brandwene, Licensed Clinical Social Worker
 

Attachment experiences generate deep ways in which we experience ourselves and others. Exploring our attachment patterns can bring deep acceptance, clarity and new ways of experiencing our own selves and others.

— Matija Petrovcic, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in Seattle,

From birth we begin to write the scripts by which all future relationships are based upon. Those scripts are often badly written and full of mistakes. Fast forward to adulthood and we can't seem to find satisfaction in a relationship, or we keep driving partners away. Fears of abandonment can destroy relationships, and codependency can leave us with nothing left for ourselves. I want to help you take a look back at how you got here so we can figure out how to get where we want to go.

— Andrew Brucker, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Pasadena, CA
 

Whether in individual or couples therapy, I will learn more about your own early experiences like your attachment styles with your parents or caregiver and help you understand how that may influence your own behavior in relation to others. This is helpful in gaining insight into what you may need from others and want from others and together we can learn how to confidently ask for what you need.

— Ana Viana, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist

I focus on how we learned to attach to others throughout our lives. What lesson's did we learn about trust? What emotions were accepted and which were rejected? I have seen how learning about how we connected with others from a very young age teaches us about how we connect with others now. When we explore these learned reactions we can relearn our relationships and be more compassionate with ourselves in our own journeys to connect with others.

— Stephanie Boulton, Counselor in Boulder, CO