Bipolar

Bipolar disorder is a mental health condition characterized by episodes of mood swings ranging from depressive lows to manic highs. Formally known as manic depression, bipolar is a serious condition that can cause dangerous behavior, including suicidal tendencies. The manic and depressive periods can be brief (hours or days) or last several weeks or even months. Bipolar disorder is typically treated with a combination of therapy and medication. If you are suffering from bipolar disorder (or suspect you might be), contact one of TherapyDen’s specialists to get help today.

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With a focus on Bipolar Disorder, I bring a nuanced understanding of the complexities associated with mood dysregulation. My expertise lies in conducting thorough evaluations, formulating personalized treatment plans, and providing ongoing support for individuals with bipolar I and II disorders. I am well-versed in the use of mood stabilizers, atypical antipsychotics, and psychoeducation to manage mood episodes effectively.

— Davonna Wilson, Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner in Portland, OR

I have extensive experience in the treatment of bipolar disorders, working from a trauma-informed therapeutic lens. My approach addresses the complex interplay between bipolar disorder and other mental health issues, such as anxiety, trauma, and substance misuse. Together, we can work towards achieving greater emotional balance and improving your overall well-being.

— Emily Burden, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Las Vegas, NV
 

I have worked with people with Bipolar Disorders for 3 years and believe a collaborative approach towards a treatment plan works best.

— Samantha Fitzgerald, Mental Health Counselor in New York, NY

I have a strong interest and background working with people with bipolar disorder. I do so under the recommendations of the APA which is to offer weekly therapy in combination with medications. Because I am working online, I may refer some clients with severe cases to in person therapy. This is to provide them with the best protection possible.

— Patricia Ellis Christensen, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , CA
 

Psychotherapy and psychoeducation, cognitive-behavioral therapy, interpersonal and social rhythm therapy are all effective in supporting those living with Bipolar Disorder. Modalities I use include functional remediation and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy.

— Fightress Aaron, Licensed Professional Counselor in Montgomery, AL

Grandmother on my mom’s side was Bipolar and so am I. I was on medications for several years until I did enough therapy to where I felt completely comfortable being medication free. DBT + combination with a lot of lifestyle changes and adjustments to my circadian rhythm have made it easier to navigate the waves.

— Steven Wright, Clinical Social Worker in Georgetown, TX
 

I have a strong interest and background working with people with bipolar disorder. I do so under the recommendations of the APA which is to offer weekly therapy in combination with medications. Because I am working online, I may refer some clients with severe cases to in person therapy. This is to provide them with the best protection possible.

— Patricia Ellis Christensen, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , CA

I have spent the last three years working specifically with adults with severe mental illness including bipolar disorders in varying stages of recovery. I also have lived experience with bipolar disorder that I can draw from when it is helpful to relate, while also recognizing that everyone's experience is unique.

— Nick Vaske, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Portland, OR
 

Are you suffering from extreme mood swings or ongoing mood deregulation or treatment resistant mood disorder? Have you tried several bipolar medications, and nothing seems to be working? I offer psychotherapy with effective medication management where you can start experiencing excellent mood and regain yourselves again. A trial will convince you.

— Hopeland Health, Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner in Phoenix, AZ

Psychotherapy and psychoeducation, cognitive-behavioral therapy, interpersonal and social rhythm therapy are all effective in supporting those living with Bipolar Disorder. Modalities I use include functional remediation and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy.

— Fightress Aaron, Licensed Professional Counselor in Montgomery, AL
 

Bipolar disorder, formerly known as manic-depressive illness, is a mental health condition characterized by extreme mood swings that include emotional highs (mania or hypomania) and lows (depression). These mood swings can affect energy levels, activity, sleep, judgment, behavior, and the ability to think clearly. Symptoms include elevated mood, increased energy, decreased need for sleep, irritability, inflated self esteem, rapid speech, risky behaviors, impulsivity and poor judgement.

— Perry Bishop, Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner

I spent the majority of my education exploring bipolar disorder. My master's thesis was on the connection between artistic genius and bipolar disorder. I can offer bipolar clients a nuanced understanding of their symptoms, and the multitude of ways bipolar can interact with their life and identity. Many of my clients who identify as bipolar have intersecting creative talents and/or exceptional abilities that sometimes dance with the various mood states of bipolar.

— Caitlin Miller, Counselor in Chicago, IL
 

I started working with individuals who struggle with bipolar disorder while in graduate school. While I believe that DBT is a great approach for many who struggle with such a disorder, I have found that Acceptance and Commitment Therapy helps all people solidify their values and align their lives to reflect personal priorities regardless of being in a manic, depressive, or remission state.

— Bradley Raburn, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Boise, ID

If you have experienced feeling hijacked by extreme mental or emotional states, and notice periods of checking out or experiencing other dissociative symptoms, a trauma-informed, healing-centered approach to Internal Family Systems can help you increase curiosity and compassion that are necessary for insight. It is possible to be more aware and attuned to what is going on inside without feeling overwhelmed, and to experience relief and ease.

— Marisa Lindsey, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Berlin, CT
 

I have worked with many clients recently diagnosed with bipolar, and I also work with clients that are experiencing a manic or depressive episode. Bipolar can disrupt life and cause chaos and suffering. My goal in working with clients is to help them understand what bipolar looks like in their life. Just because you are diagnosed as bipolar it does not have to define your life. You are more than your diagnosis.

— Cori Ross, Therapist in Alpharetta, GA

Bipolar can be a difficult experience, but it does not have to be a negative one. Together I help my clients understand the way their cycles and symptoms effect their lives, create interventions to reduce vulnerabilities and increase protective factors, and see themselves as the whole person they are.

— Nicole Depasquale, Licensed Professional Counselor in Beachwood, NJ
 

Bipolar disorder, formerly known as manic-depressive illness, is a mental health condition characterized by extreme mood swings that include emotional highs (mania or hypomania) and lows (depression). These mood swings can affect energy levels, activity, sleep, judgment, behavior, and the ability to think clearly.

— Perry Bishop, Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner

I enjoy working with people who have bipolar disorder and other mood disorders. I ran groups for people with bipolar disorder for more than eight years in a previous position. When I work with mood issues, usually we focus on a combination of things like improving your self care, using mindfulness based therapies/DBT, and sometimes considering medications. Together we learn about your key warning signs for depression or hypomania and what to do if you start feeling that way.

— Lisette Lahana, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Oakland, CA
 

Being a dual diagnosis clinician, I have built specific skills to help patients of all ages challenge their mental health symptoms from bipolar disorder, anxiety, and depression, among others. Working openly and honestly with patients they learn new techniques to manage their symptoms effectively.

— Dawn Ginestra, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX