Burnout

Burnout is a special type of stress – and it doesn’t just come from working long hours (although that can certainly contribute over time). Burnout can be caused by a variety of factors including a lack of work/life balance, unclear job expectations, a dysfunctional workplace, a lack of support or poor job fit. Those who work in a helping professional are especially at risk. Common symptoms of burnout include depression, cynicism and lethargy. If left unaddressed, burnout can affect your physical health contributing to numerous ailments including insomnia, high cholesterol and heart disease. But the good news is that burnout does not have to be a permanent condition. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s burnout experts to start your journey towards recovery!

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Meet the specialists

 

I'm particularly adept at supporting health care workers like doctors, nurses, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and students of health professions. Other professions I support when people are feeling burnout include code monkeys and tech workers, other therapists and professional helpers, teachers, and social or environmental justice workers.

— Robin DeBates, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Philadelphia, PA

Burnout applies to work AND life. You can be fried about the treadmill that is your job, you can be weary to your core about the slog that is your daily routine, and you can be fed up with the useless dance that you have with people close to you (or fed up with your own isolation). The worn-down malaise that clouds your world is here to deliver an important message: it's time for a change. Let's see where you need to make shifts and how you can approach those changes with energy and ease.

— Margaret Graham, Licensed Professional Counselor
 

I have worked in large healthcare systems for the majority of my career and have seen the suffering that trickles down when healthcare providers are silenced and unsupported. Ever increasing demands without the resources available to meet those demands are a fast track to burnout. My goal is not to help those in abusive situations tolerate those situations better, but to help those experiencing burnout explore creative options for taking the best care of themselves possible.

— Jennifer Kilkus, Clinical Psychologist

I work with many working professionals managing challenging work environments, compassion fatigue and burnout.

— Kedian Dixon, Licensed Professional Counselor in Houston, TX
 

Burnout is something that is so difficult to recognize, because it happens so slowly. Sometimes we recognize these stressful things, and we tell ourselves that we can handle it. But then it keeps happening again and again. Eventually we can't handle it anymore, and that's burnout. We can make changes in our lives to deal with burnout though. It may not feel this way right now, but you can make positive changes in your life.

— Danielle Wayne, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Boise, ID

I know the tenacity and perseverance it takes to raise children and manage a household while having the audacity to strive for professional goals. The pressure you feel can be crushing, and you find yourself in the same old pattern of self-doubt, care-taking, and people-pleasing resulting in complete burnout. When you are ready, I am here to help you stop the cycle. Take pause, connect to your authentic self, learn to trust yourself, and accept yourself separate from your achievements.

— Angela Langer, Psychotherapist in Red Wing, MN
 

Burnout happens when you've reached a state of complete exhaustion, mentally, emotionally, or physically. It's accompanied by a lack of drive or motivation, and when it's really bad - feelings of depression and hopelessness. Burnout is hard to muscle your way through since the reason it's finally arrived at your doorstep is because you HAVE been muscling your way through. It's just that it isn't working anymore.

— Whitney Russell, Licensed Professional Counselor in convenient and effective online therapy and career coaching in Denver, Colorado Springs, Fort Collins, Boulder, and all across Colorado, CO

Ever feel like everything is just too much? Not getting as much done as you used to? Nothing feels worth it anymore? You may be experiencing burnout. Recognizing what's happening is a critical first step, and then working on balancing work and life--and giving yourself permission to do that--is important. We may also explore boundary setting and other workplace skills, as well as taking time for yourself: therapy is that first step.

— Christa Cummins, Professional Counselor Associate in Portland, OR
 

Burnout is often used to describe toxic job environments and how an employee is feeling. However, burnout at our job is not the only place we experience it. We can experience burnout with: family relationships, parenting, social media, news/media, pandemic, non-family relationships, healthcare, helping and giving to others. I specialize with BIPOC professionals in managing burnout and how to approach it with self-compassion and action.

— Valeska Cosci, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Venice, CA

Ever feel like everything is just too much? Not getting as much done as you used to? Nothing feels worth it anymore? You may be experiencing burnout. Recognizing what's happening is a critical first step, and then working on balancing work and life--and giving yourself permission to do that--is important. We'll also work on boundary setting and other workplace skills, as well as taking time for yourself: and therapy is that first step.

— Christa Cummins, Professional Counselor Associate in Portland, OR
 

Olivia has experience working with individuals from many different professions regarding work related burnout and compassion fatigue.

— Olivia Van Ness, Licensed Professional Counselor in Fort Worth, TX

You feel depleted. Your personal life and/or your health is suffering because you work all the time. You may be feeling jaded, cynical or hopeless in regards to your job. You are not doing the kind of work that you are capable of and you may feel like you just want to quit.

— Sabrina Basquez, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Greensboro, NC
 

Are you trying to find a better work/life balance in your professional and demanding career? Or are you involved in animal care or rescue? Navigating the care for a family member? A new parent? Social activist? A volunteer in your community? If compassion is a demand placed on you every day, it can quickly drain your empathy reserves leaving you feeling worn out, numb, and dreading the next day. Let's restore your energy (and empathy) reserves so that you can feel rejuvenated in all you do!

— Colleen Ignatowski, Therapist in Rochester, NY

I support clients learning how to reclaim their time, implement healthier boundaries and manage / prevent burnout.

— Monique Dunn, Clinical Social Worker in Houston, TX
 

Covid-19 has changed the way we live/work & has greatly increased risk of burnout. Burnout manifests as exhaustion, irritability or lacking in self-efficacy in the workplace. This can be due to low staffing, lack of resources, excessive demands, lack of respect/recognition & workplace hazards. The consequences take a toll on our physical & emotional well being. With dedication, compassion and collaboration, I help you cope, regain a sense of control & together we make a plan for moving forward.

— Laura Taets, Clinical Social Worker in Westport, CT

Have you worked hard to have a career you're passionate about only to find yourself burned out and resentful? Burnout involves feelings of emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and reduced feelings of accomplishment. While all people are prone to burnout, helping professionals are especially vulnerable. It is vitally important for those in jobs that involve healing to cultivate a discipline of hope and renewable "fuel" for our work.

— Liz Fletcher, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Oklahoma City, OK
 

Burnout is fairly common with driven and highly motivated people. This can be a result of overwork, overwhelming life responsibilities, and lack of adequate care for oneself. When working with burnout, we first seek to identify the thought patterns that got you there. Then through cognitive and action oriented behavioral work, we reframe your patterns to give you more space, more rest, and challenge you in ways that allow you to be more you, and less someone trying to be everything to everyone.

— Alena Gerst, Psychotherapist in New York, NY

Vicarious trauma is a real thing. First responders, helping professionals and caregivers are susceptible to trauma and burnout. I have worked with those who have experienced this, as a wellness coordinator for mental health professionals. Using a positive psychology framework, I assist clients in gaining a sense of meaning, establishing healthy boundaries and enhancing positive emotions.

— Christina Scott, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Portsmouth, OH
 

You're not feeling as productive at work and struggle to get up in the morning. You're desire in your relationships has waned and you just want to zone out most of the day. Calling out sick is becoming a weekly consideration. Burnout from work and your relationships is common AND treatable. Together we can help you identify the causes of burnout and create a plan to bring more meaning back to your life.

— Kristin Tand, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

Burnout happens when you've reached a state of complete exhaustion, mentally, emotionally, or physically. It's accompanied by a lack of drive or motivation, and when it's really bad - feelings of depression and hopelessness. Burnout is hard to muscle your way through since the reason it's finally arrived at your doorstep is because you HAVE been muscling your way through. It's just that it isn't working anymore.

— Whitney Russell, LPC, Licensed Professional Counselor in convenient and effective online therapy & career coaching in Austin, Dallas/Ft Worth, Houston, San Antonio, and everywhere across Texas, TX