Culturally Sensitive Therapy

Culturally sensitive therapy is an approach in which therapists emphasize understanding a client's background, ethnicity, and belief system. Therapists that specialize in culturally sensitive therapy will accommodate and respect the differences in practices, traditions, values and opinions of different cultures and integrate those differences into therapeutic treatment. Culturally sensitive therapy will typically lead with a thorough assessment of the culture the client identifies with. This approach can both help a client feel comfortable and at ease, and lead to more positive therapeutic outcomes – for example, depression may look different depending on your cultural background. Think this is approach may be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapDen’s culturally sensitive therapy experts today.

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Meet the specialists

 

I use a systemic and non-pathologizing approach in order to look at the different life stressors that our society, environments, family, and educational systems have created and imposed upon us through time.

— Saren Craig, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in , OR

I believe that context matters, and recognize that each individual exists in a larger system (family system, cultural context, etc). I am curious about how issues that present themselves in therapy may be informed by these larger contexts and systems, which also includes an awareness of issues related to power, privilege, and marginalization. I bring this curiosity with me, while honoring you as the expert in your own experience.

— Dr. Luana Bessa, Psychologist in Boston, MA
 

Dr. Rouse Weir recognizes the cultural impact on human development, values and successful strategies. The client and his/her/their experiences and values guide the treatment plan. Non-judgmental and she embraces multicultural viewpoints as they relate to gender, spirituality and communication. Treatment plans are designed with this in mind as the strategies and goals must fit your lifestyle.

— Katrin Rouse-Weir, Psychologist in Indian Orchard, MA

I have special expertise in bilingual assessment and multicultural competence in both graduate school and internship training. I have extensive clinical experience working with culturally diverse clients and continue to stay current in culturally sensitive therapy through workshops. I have published, conducted workshops, and served as an expert consultant in several states in the area of bilingual assessment.

— Marylyn Sines, Psychologist in Southlake, TX
 

Societal oppression and discrimination so influence our mental health. Isolation from the pandemic even more so. When we're discriminated on the basis of race, gender identity, sexuality, health, etc., we learn to silence our voice and take up less space. We learn to hold the shame of our identity &that takes a toll. I hold a grad certificate in gender, women's, sexuality studies and my passions are fueled by empowering the voices of those who have been marginalized, silenced, and/or erased.

— Colby Bruner, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Overland Park, KS

For someone who holds an identity that is a cultural other, it is important that therapy is a space that is protected from further cultural othering. Culturally sensitive or Culturally humble therapy is a space that prioritizes and centers someone's cultural experience. Meaning, you don't have to defend why your family was the way it was - rather, you can experience acceptance for your cultural parts and process healing in therapy together.

— Ji Eun Ko, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Diego, CA
 

As a bicultural/bilingual therapist, I am attuned to the profound impact of my clients‘ cultural background on their communication.

— Antje Hofmeister, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

Personal life experience and 6 years professional experience

— Myra Flor Arpin, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in Shoreline, WA
 

As a white clinician, I strongly believe it is my job to orient my work around acknowledging systems of oppression, because I know the therapy room exists in the world, not in a vacuum. I believe therapy can be a liberation tool against oppression because the more we can feel, grieve and talk about these systems, the more fortified we are to resist them. Your ancestral roots, intersecting identities, and cultural practices are an honor for me to make space for in our work together.

— Talia Chanoff, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in ,

I was raised in a family that were open minded. Throughout my life I have sought to be involved in social justice activities. I acquired a minor in ethnic studies and surround myself with people different from myself to continue to grow. I seek opportunities for additional training in cultural competency. The most important thing that makes me an expert in this area is knowing that I am not an expert in others' lives and learning never ends, it is ongoing.

— ShannonElaine John, Counselor in Fort Morgan, CO
 

I keep a close eye on what role the environments you have inhabited may have played on your current views about yourself, others, and the world at large, and I constantly invite you to do the same. It can be very empowering to realize how you came to embrace your beliefs, and with that information, be able to decide which of them you want to keep or reject.

— Nancy Juscamaita, Licensed Mental Health Counselor

For someone who holds an identity that is a cultural other, it is important that therapy is a space that is protected from further cultural othering. Culturally sensitive or Culturally humble therapy is a space that prioritizes and centers someone's cultural experience. Meaning, you don't have to defend why your family was the way it was - rather, you can experience acceptance for your cultural parts and process healing in therapy together.

— Ji Eun Ko, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Diego, CA
 

I am working every day to learn more about people who are different from me. I seek to understand your own experience as you have it, not as I think you should or how I assume it must be. My work as a white person involves constantly checking my assumptions and bias. I will not assume that your identities are the reasons you want help in therapy (if you're trans, you might just want help because your boss is a jerk), yet I will invite discussion of them so I know what it is like to be you.

— Lisa Wenninger, Counselor in teletherapy only, CA

In order to heal, you must be accurately seen and accepted! I see therapy as an opportunity for you to be seen in your wholeness, while we unpack the systemic and structural oppression you combat and survive every day. I utilize careful attunement in session to understand you as the incredible, unique, expansive person you are. Outside of session, I remain active in my own education to better understand various identities you may hold that are different from my own.

— Sam Krehel, Mental Health Counselor in , WA
 

As a Black gay male therapist, I feel I understand people's needs who come from diverse cultural backgrounds. As a person who endeavors to be culturally humble, I encourage exploration in the areas of Age, Developmental disabilities, Indigenous heritage, National origin, Racial identity, Ethnic identity, Gender, Socioeconomic Status, and sexual orientation.

— Uriah Cty M.A., LMFT # 121606, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Societal oppression and discrimination so influence our mental health. Isolation from the pandemic even more so. When we're discriminated on the basis of race, gender identity, sexuality, health, etc., we learn to silence our voice and take up less space. When we find our community, things start to shift and change. I hold a grad certificate in gender, women's, sexuality studies and my passions are fueled by empowering the voices of those who have been marginalized, silenced, and/or erased.

— Colby Bruner, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Overland Park, KS
 

This is probably the best term to describe an awareness of privilege and oppression in my work, navigating those pieces as they arise in my work with individuals from various backgrounds and lived experiences, those managing microaggressions and experiencing oppression related to their intersecting identities, and still aiming to create understanding and a healing space for them to feel heard, understood, cared for, and not have to explain everything about their background or be stereotyped.

— addyson tucker, Psychologist in Providence, RI