Culturally Sensitive Therapy

Culturally sensitive therapy is an approach in which therapists emphasize understanding a client's background, ethnicity, and belief system. Therapists that specialize in culturally sensitive therapy will accommodate and respect the differences in practices, traditions, values and opinions of different cultures and integrate those differences into therapeutic treatment. Culturally sensitive therapy will typically lead with a thorough assessment of the culture the client identifies with. This approach can both help a client feel comfortable and at ease, and lead to more positive therapeutic outcomes – for example, depression may look different depending on your cultural background. Think this is approach may be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapDen’s culturally sensitive therapy experts today.

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Meet the specialists

 

Culture informs how we view and understand our values and others around us. It's important to integrate that into therapy, as well as for your therapist to respect and understand your perspective.

— Kameryn "Yams" Rose, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , CA

Many of the clients who see me experience identity issues or trauma symptoms related to racially based or intergenerational traumas. My professional training and experience as an activist and advocate spanning decades underlies much of my focus on racial and social justice. I'm particularly attuned to issues of "difference" among those whose experiences do not reflect dominant thinking regardless of whether that experience reflects marginalization: Mixed-race, interracial and multicultural.

— Meira Greenfeld, Psychotherapist in Phoenix, AZ
 

I have special expertise in bilingual assessment and multicultural competence in both graduate school and internship training. I have extensive clinical experience working with culturally diverse clients and continue to stay current in culturally sensitive therapy through workshops. I have published, conducted workshops, and served as an expert consultant in several states in the area of bilingual assessment.

— Marylyn Sines, Psychologist in Southlake, TX

A culturally sensitive therapist is one who is intentionally and mindfully curious about all ways of being human and all ways of healing. For the therapist, this takes work and deep listening, a willingness to be moved, disturbed, and humbled. Cultural sensitivity is understanding that there are experiences and feelings that you can never fully know or understand because you will never experience these things yourself (humility). It means staying vigilant for signs of implicit bias within.

— Beth Holzhauer, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Evanston, IL
 

I do not know everything about your culture, and I will not act as if I do. I will take time to get to know you and how your culture impacts your desire to make changes.

— Erin Ratchford, Clinical Social Worker in Sioux Falls, SD

As a Black gay male therapist, I feel I understand people's needs who come from diverse cultural backgrounds. As a person who endeavors to be culturally humble, I encourage exploration in the areas of Age, Developmental disabilities, Indigenous heritage, National origin, Racial identity, Ethnic identity, Gender, Socioeconomic Status, and sexual orientation.

— Uriah Cty M.A., LMFT # 121606, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Beverly Hills, CA
 

A culturally sensitive therapist is one who is intentionally and mindfully curious about all ways of being human and all ways of healing. For the therapist, this takes work and deep listening, a willingness to be moved, disturbed, and humbled. Cultural sensitivity is understanding that there are experiences and feelings that you can never fully know or understand because you will never experience these things yourself (humility). It means staying vigilant for signs of implicit bias within.

— Beth Holzhauer, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Evanston, IL

In a culturally responsive and humble approach, I work to bring all aspects of your identity as strengths in the counseling environment. I believe that when we are in touch with all aspects of our identity, we are better able to proactively address the challenges that are facing us.

— Eldridge Greer, Clinical Psychologist in Denver, CO
 

I am a queer, feminist therapist and coming from a systems background, believe that the environments and systems we are surviving within impact our sense of safety and our sense of self. I work hard to deconstruct and unpack the ways our shitty cultural norms negatively impact my clients and connect them back to an internalized sense of self-worth, self-esteem, self-validation, and safety.

— Ginelle Guckenburg, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in San Diego, CA

Culture plays a large role in how we express ourselves, how we are viewed by others, and how we experience our every day life.

— Samantha Fitzgerald, Mental Health Counselor in New York, NY
 

Our clinic prides itself on uplifting clients who come from under-served communities. We respect the intersectionality inherent in all of us and treat the whole client in context. In addition, we mindfully employ clinicians from multiple gender, cultural, and disability backgrounds.

— Barefoot And Balanced Therapy, Licensed Professional Counselor in Clackamas, OR

To paraphrase Ignacio Martin-Boro, for psychology to be truly emancipatory it must first sever itself from its own idealogical chains, from psychology itself. Dominant psychologies implicitly serve the status quo by defining health as adjustment to white, middle class, heteronormative, colonialist social norms. I aim to support you in reconnecting to your own cultural-historical-ancestral sources of health, healing, & resilience towards a deep integration of heart, body, spirit, story, & culture

— Nima Saalabi, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Sebastopol, CA
 

I think this is a key foundation to any therapy.

— Heather Tahler, Psychologist

As a black woman I understand the unique stressors that come with navigating the world as a person of color. Due to this I ensure we discuss racial identity in the therapeutic process, both the strengths we gain from it and the harm you may have experienced as a result.

— April Taylor, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Portland, OR
 

We are a diverse group of therapists, social workers, and counselors from various walks of life. Our collective experiences enable us to offer telemental health online therapy services and individualized treatment in a kind and compassionate manner.

— Denise Harlan, Clinical Social Worker in Riverside, CA

Personal life experience and 6 years professional experience

— Myra Flor Arpin, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in Shoreline, WA
 

I have experience working with individuals from a wide variety of backgrounds and their families, and I am always eager to learn more about others.

— Mariah Masell, Social Worker in Grand Rapids, MI

Social justice and advocacy are core pieces to a therapist's identity. They have to be able to navigate complex cultural issues that transcend race and cultural identity. These issues are often the source of a lot of the issues our clients are struggling, and a therapist must be able to identify the impact of culture and identity on the presenting issue.

— Saara Amri, Licensed Professional Counselor in Springfield, VA