Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is an evidence-based psychotherapy, first developed in the 1980s by Marsha M. Linehan, to treat patients suffering from borderline personality disorder. Since then, DBT’s use has broadened and now it is regularly employed as part of a treatment plan for people struggling with behaviors or emotions they can't control. This can include eating disorders, substance abuse, self-harm, and more. DBT is a skills-based approach that focuses on helping people increase their emotional and cognitive control by learning the triggers that lead to unwanted behaviors. Once triggers are identified, DBT teaches coping skills that include mindfulness, emotion regulation, distress tolerance, and interpersonal effectiveness. A therapist specializing in DBT will help you to enhance your own capabilities, improve your motivation, provide support in-the-moment, and better manage your own life with problem-solving strategies. Think this approach might work for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s DBT specialists today.

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I offer a DBT informed approach (not strictly DBT as I pull from other modalities when appropriate) as to me it is the most all encompassing therapy I have come across. It helps teach life skills such as mindfulness practice, radical acceptance, distress tolerance, interpersonal effectiveness and emotional regulation. All such skills can help with most mental health challenges and addictive tendencies.

— Krissy Moses, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Winter Park, FL

I have spent 4 years studying and using DBT in my personal life and with my clients. I utilize the DBT skills of mindfulness, emotion regulation, distress tolerance, and interpersonal effectiveness to help my clients create a life worth living.

— Amanda Wetegrove-Romine, Psychologist in San Antonio, TX
 

DBT provides what I call an encyclopedia of excellent behavioral coping skills which fall into five categories: changing unhealthy behaviors, mindfulness, emotion regulation, distress tolerance, and interpersonal skills. We work through these skills to identify which ones will be most beneficial for you to integrate into your own life and how you can best utilize them. DBT focuses heavily on the concept of balance, especially between reason and emotion.

— Adam Stanford, Counselor in , CO

Dialectical Behavioral Therapy was originally developed to help individuals suffering from Borderline Personality Disorder, but I believe that these tools can help all of us. We work to integrate skills with a foundation of mindfulness to slow down and understand what is happening in the moment. That is where you can start to gain back your power and take control over your response.

— Emmily Weldon, Counselor in Port St. Lucie, FL
 

DBT skills based work can provide both long term and short term relief for many mental health symptoms and struggles.

— Kassondra Wilson, Mental Health Counselor in , WA

I have found that DBT can be used in treatment plans for a plethora of psychological problems. This includes stress, anxiety, depression, trauma, and of course personality disorders. I enjoy helping clients learn and apply the four components of DBT into their lives, which include Mindfulness, Distress Tolerance, Emotional Regulation, and Interpersonal Effectiveness. DBT gives clients a ton of tools to add to their toolbox.

— Dr. Angela Webb, Clinical Psychologist in Bonne Terre, MO
 

Mondays I work with Kristen Lund in St. Paul as a DBT therapist, helping those struggling with emotional regulation. Difficulty regulating emotions often stems from past trauma and from not being taught these skills as young children. Part of your treatment can include participation in DBT group in order to learn and practice concrete skills needed to be effective in your life moving forward.

— Linnea Logas, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Minneapolis, MN

This is a cognitive form of treatment that is focused on four core skill groups which are meant to help people "live a life worth living". These four core skill groups include mindfulness, distress tolerance, emotion regulation, and interpersonal effectiveness. DBT will teach you actionable skills to engage with your environment in order to help you regulate your emotions which may change ineffective thinking patterns as a result.

— Matthew Braman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker
 

Feeling overwhelmed, out of control, or like your feelings are too much? Find yourself shutting down, lashing out, or doing whatever you can to distract yourself from negative thoughts? Through DBT, you'll build personalized strategies for distress tolerance, emotion regulation, mindfulness, and interpersonal effectiveness. You'll develop a stronger sense of your values and preferences, practice setting healthier boundaries, and design a life worth living.

— Lisa Andresen, LCSW, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in San Francisco, CA
 

DBT helps change lives! Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is a cognitive behavioral treatment developed by Marsha Linehan, PhD, ABPP. It emphasizes individual psychotherapy and group skills training classes to help people learn and use new skills and strategies to develop a life that they experience as worth living. DBT skills include skills for mindfulness, emotion regulation, distress tolerance, and interpersonal effectiveness. For more in-depth info see https://behavioraltech.org/resources/faqs/dialectical-behavior-therapy-dbt/. I am a certified DBT therapist and have been leading DBT Programs since 1997 and would be happy to help.

— Kimberly Krueger MSW, LCSW, Counselor in Davidson, NC

Dialectical Behavior Therapy is used to help with a variety of mental/behavioral health concerns such as personality and mood disorders. The mindfulness focus helps with creating insight and reducing stress.

— Hope Perini, Counselor in Barre, VT
 

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is a cognitive behavioral treatment developed by Marsha Linehan, PhD, ABPP. It emphasizes individual psychotherapy and group skills training classes to help people learn and use new skills and strategies to develop a life that they experience as worth living. DBT skills include skills for mindfulness, emotion regulation, distress tolerance, and interpersonal effectiveness.

— Kimberly Krueger MSW, LCSW, Counselor in Davidson, NC

I have experience integrating DBT skills spanning over 5 years of work. I first learned to apply DBT at an inpatient center for eating disorders, and have since worked to apply DBT skills with all sorts of intense emotional challenges. I often use a variety of treatments to meet individual needs.

— Kim Lycan, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Richland, WA
 

DBT helps clients with emotional regulation, interpersonal skills, mindfulness, and distress tolerance. This is another type of therapy that is homework-based and there are so many skills to learn!

— Simi Bhaurla, Associate Professional Clinical Counselor in Los Gatos, CA

I am certified in DBT through the evergreen institute and have worked hard to maintain this certification throughout the years. DBT have 4 modalities all of which can be helpful during eating disorder recovery.

— Gabrielle Morreale, Counselor in Ambler, PA
 

Do you sometimes wonder why life looks so easy for others, but you just feel overwhelmed most of the time. DBT is SO helpful! It's all about finding skills that you can do at school/work, home or anywhere that you need them to feel in control & capable of doing hard things. If you aren't the touchy-feely type or you aren't quite ready to go deep and heal your trauma, DBT can be a great option. It is practical, action-oriented, and based on research so you know the skills will work.

— Katy Harmon, Licensed Clinical Social Worker - Candidate in Austin, TX

While typically one of the best treatments for Borderline Personality Disorder, its focus on mindfulness, interpersonal effectiveness, distress tolerance, and emotion regulation skills are applicable for all of us. I use the full protocol as well as an adapted and DBT informed approach usually to improve emotion regulation and tolerance of distress.

— Melody Mickens, Clinical Psychologist in Richmond, VA