Eating Disorders

Eating disorders are characterized by persistent food-related or eating behaviors that harm your health, emotions, or ability to function. They often involve an individual focusing too much on weight, body shape, and food. Most commonly, these take the form of anorexia, bulimia, or binge-eating. Anorexia involves excessively limiting calories and/or using other methods to lose weight (e.g. exercise, laxatives). People with anorexia often have an extreme fear of gaining weight and have an abnormally low body weight, along with a distorted perception of their weight or body shape. Bulimia involves periods of eating a large amount of food in a short time (bingeing), followed by attempting to rid oneself of the extra calories in an unhealthy way (such as forced vomiting). These behaviors are often accompanied by a sense of a total lack of control. Binge-eating disorder involves eating too much food, past the point of being full, at least once a week, and feeling a lack of control over this behavior. If you recognize any of these symptoms in yourself, a qualified professional therapist can help. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s eating disorder experts for help today.

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It may feel like the eating disorder is taking over your life. Maybe you’re stuck in shame and patterns you know aren’t serving you. You want to reclaim your life and work through the underlying issues that impact your relationship to food & body. I approach issues around food & body from a trauma-informed, intersectional, and HAES (Health at Every Size) lens. I'm passionate about helping you reconnect with joy around food & cooking, finding neutrality & joy in your body.

— Lindsay Moldovan, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR

I have several years of experience in treating Avoidant Restrictive Food Intake Disorder. I am trained in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for ARFID, Family Base Therapy for Anorexia and restrictive eating and a HAES aligned provider supporting binge eating disorder.

— Amanda Hagos, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Fremont, CA
 

I have specialized training and and experience in treating eating disorders.

— Beth Zumwalt, Licensed Professional Counselor in Chattanooga, TN

For the past seven years, I have worked with clients struggling with eating disorders at the partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient, and outpatient level. After working as a milieu therapist, primary therapist, and group therapy facilitator at an eating disorder treatment center, I began working as an outpatient therapist in private practice specifically focusing on members of the LGBTQ+ community who struggle with body image and eating disorder behaviors.

— Zach Verwey, Licensed Professional Counselor in Denver, CO
 

Alyson is a Certified Eating Disorder Specialist-supervisor. She has been working in the eating disorder field for over 15 years and has experience working at higher levels of care as well as outpatient therapy. Alyson takes a compassionate approach to treating eating disorders which integrates client-centered therapy and evidence based practices.

— Alyson Lischer, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Diego, CA

I use a blend of approaches to help people break free from eating disorders such as binge eating disorder, bulimia nervosa, and negative body image. As a Health at Every Size-aligned therapist, I support body diversity and acknowledge the structural forces that impinge on wellbeing. I utilize weight-neutral, evidence-based approached such as Intuitive Eating, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Dialectical Behavior Therapy, Mindful Self-Compassion, & Acceptance and Commitment Therapy.

— Regina Lazarovich, Clinical Psychologist in Scotts Valley, CA
 

Eating disorders are typically a symptom of something much bigger we have struggled with in our lives. Living with an eating disorder typically looks like constantly maintaining control in a world where you constantly feel out of control. You may filter "food noise" every moment of the day, whether that's counting down to the next time you eat or guilting yourself for the last thing you ate. Healing looks like control in healthy ways and freedom from the noise.

— Stephanie Townsend, Licensed Master of Social Work in Atlanta, GA

Early relational trauma: loneliness, unreliable caregivers, abuse, abandonment, shaming, -can result in lifelong patterns of disordered eating and substance abuse. Bulimic binging, Anorexic restricting, or using an addictive “drug of choice” fills-in for an insecure attachment until we break the pattern. We work to find the “right fit” in Relational Therapy, Archetypal Analysis, Psychoanalysis, Brainspotting, -re-connecting to the Soulful identity you were meant to be!

— Rebecca Spear, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Pasadena, CA
 

Food is one of the earliest ways we humans experience nurturance and interaction with a caring adult. food takes on many meanings about relationships, needs, control, and the value of self. The development of an eating disorder signals a problem in one or several of these areas; it arises as an attempt to solve this problem, by drawing attention to the problem, by pulling the family together to address symptoms of the eating disorder; or expressing/repressing feelings related to current problem.

— Tatum Santacasa, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Aurora, CO

Having worked at a residential eating disorder facility for over 15 years, I am knowledgable and passionate about helping individuals who struggle with bulimia nervosa, anorexia, binge eating disorder, food addiction, and emotional eating. In my experience, we begin using food as a way to control things when most other things are outside of our control. It starts as a solution that over time becomes a problem that is difficult to address without support.

— Kristina Beaudry, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Davie, FL
 

I have a history of working with clients with eating disorders, and find that body positivity is an integral part of any body belief.

— Meghan FitzPatrick, Psychologist in New York, NY

Disordered eating is unfortunately quite normalized in our culture. Even so, if your relationship with food, exercise, or your body is causing you stress or is taking up too much of your time or attention, you deserve help and healing. This is true no matter what you weigh or no matter how "bad" your symptoms may or may not seem.

— Josie Munroe, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Springfield, VT
 

Once you made the choice to begin living your life again and not use your eating or lack thereof to deal with your given problems, I can show you how to do that. I can also show you how to reconnect with the different parts of you to create a more harmonious balance between what happens in life and your reactions to it. I can help you connect to your body in a way that helps you feel more centered and grounded and less chaotic and anxious. You will get your life back

— Yoni Banayan, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Las Vegas, NV

Eating disorders are a range of psychological conditions that cause unhealthy eating habits to develop. They might start with an obsession with food, body weight, or body shape. In severe cases, eating disorders can cause serious health consequences and may even result in death if left untreated. Page Morris has extensive experience working with eating disorders and knowledge of the best programs around the country if that is needed for your individual treatment.

— First Steps Psychological Services,LLC, Psychotherapist in North Bethesda, MD
 

Food is one of the earliest ways we humans experience nurturance and interaction with a caring adult. food takes on many meanings about relationships, needs, control, and the value of self. The development of an eating disorder signals a problem in one or several of these areas; it arises as an attempt to solve this problem, by drawing attention to the problem, by pulling the family together to address symptoms of the eating disorder; or expressing/repressing feelings related to current problem.

— Tatum Santacasa, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Aurora, CO

As a nutritionist and mental health provider, I am able to provide integrative care to folks who are struggling with various forms of disordered eating. This can include restriction, bingeing, compensatory behaviors, and other symptoms that impact our relationship with food. My hope is to explore this relationship with you and find a path forward that feels less rigid and in support of your individual health needs. I am an intuitive eating provider who acknowledges the impacts of diet-culture.

— Vanessa Steffny, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Bellevue, WA
 

I completed my eating disorder speciality via my post-doctoral internship and have provided therapy to people struggling to overcome anorexia, bulimia, binge eating, and other disordered eating. Eating disorders are often rooted in shame, trauma, negative self-image, control, and unhealthy societal standards. I will work with you to identify the root causes of your struggles, to change destructive thought patterns, and to work towards self-acceptance, eating intuitively, and full recovery.

— Mirella Young, Clinical Psychologist in Longmeadow, MA

For the past seven years, I have worked with clients struggling with eating disorders at the partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient, and outpatient level. After working as a milieu therapist, primary therapist, and group therapy facilitator at an eating disorder treatment center, I began working as an outpatient therapist in private practice specifically focusing on members of the LGBTQ+ community who struggle with body image and eating

— Zach Verwey, Licensed Professional Counselor in Denver, CO
 

As a nutritionist and mental health provider, I am able to provide integrative care to folks who are struggling with various forms of disordered eating. This can include restriction, bingeing, compensatory behaviors, and other symptoms that impact our relationship with food. My hope is to explore this relationship with you and find a path forward that feels less rigid and in support of your individual health needs. I am an intuitive eating provider who acknowledges the impacts of diet-culture.

— Vanessa Steffny, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Bellevue, WA

At The Couch Therapy, we are a therapy practice that offers health at every size (HAES) therapy for eating disorders or disordered eating. We believe in a gentle approach to helping those struggling with disordered eating. When working with a HAES aligned therapist, you can expect to sit in a safe space to process the timeline of your relationship with food, process significant moments in life that influenced your beliefs, and remind you to release the petri dish of shame you’ve been holding.

— The Couch Therapy, Psychotherapist in Colleyville, TX