EMDR

Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) relies on a client's own rapid, rhythmic eye movements, and is founded on the belief that these eye movements can weaken the intensity of emotionally charged memories. EMDR is most often used to treat PTSD or other traumas, but is also sometimes used for panic attacks, eating disorders, addictions, and anxiety. EMDR sessions can last up to 90 minutes, and usually starts with a client rating their level of distress. A therapist then typically moves their fingers in front of your face (or sometimes toe tapping or musical tones), asking you to follow along with your eyes, while you recall a traumatic event and all the sensations that come with it. You will gradually be guided by the therapist to shift thoughts from the traumatic experience to a more comforting one. The goal of EMDR is to make disturbing memories less immobilizing. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s EMDR specialists today.

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EMDR has been shown to help those suffering from the burden of their trauma history. It has also been shown to be highly effective as a way of helping clients looking to shift out of negative beliefs that are holding them back from living a fulfilling life. Most clients report being at peace with the issue they came into therapy with, gaining insights about what happened to them and are able to move on from therapy feeling more free and less burdened by the issue that brought them here.

— Jordan Nodelman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Wilton Manors, FL

I laughed hysterically the first time I experienced the full effects of EMDR because I could not believe it worked so well on me, but it did! Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy is an extensively researched, effective psychotherapy method proven to help people recover from trauma and other distressing life experiences, including PTSD, anxiety, depression, and panic disorders.

— Kenneth Nelan, Licensed Professional Counselor in Mequon, WI
 

I was EMDR trained by EMDRIA approved consultant Rachel Harrison, LCPC, NCC of Trauma Specialists of Maryland. I've worked with dozens of clients seeking EMDR treatment, and have found it particularlypowerful pairing it with IFS and Mindfulness to create a holistic body, mind, and emotional connection.

— Safrianna DeGroat, Counselor in Frederick, MD

EMDR is an evidence based treatment for many different issues such as PTSD, trauma, anxiety, depression and panic attacks. EMDR helps your brain reprocess traumatic and/or uncomfortable events in your life that keep coming up that prevent you from healing. When looking for an EMDR therapist, it is important to find a therapist that has been EMDRIA trained for EMDR.

— Rachel Boyle, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern
 

I am EMDR Trained to help you re-process past experiences that are likely causing you discomfort. With EMDR, you can experience enhanced coping with chronic health issues. You'll finally have a chance to breathe when previously you've been stuck. Bilateral processing helps you develop a deeper connection to safety as well as a way for stuck emotions and experiences to finally become free.

— Patrick Tully, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy is an integrative psychotherapy approach that has been extensively researched and proven effective for the treatment of trauma. EMDR is a set of standardized protocols that incorporates elements from different treatment approaches.

— Dr. David Shoup, Psychologist in Pacifica, CA
 

EMDR uses eye movements or sound to help you reprocess experiences that your brain hasn't stored in a helpful way. EMDR makes those memories less powerful and gives you relief from anxiety, depression, or PTSD.

— Regina Stiffler, Licensed Professional Counselor

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), is a really cool, interesting, and neuroscientific form of therapy. It is primarily used to help relieve clients from unresolved trauma and negative experiences.

— Kelsey Riddle, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Scottsdale, AZ
 

I completed levels 1 and 2 EMDR trainings through the EMDR Humanitarian Assistance Program and completed all of the required instructional and consultation hours to become a qualified EMDR therapist. I have been integrating EMDR into my work with clients for the past 3 years.

— JD Wright, Psychologist in Gainesville, FL

I am trained and have expertise in EMDR Therapy. EMDR is extremely helpful in healing any kind of trauma. I have experienced tremendous healing in just one session of EMDR. When we experience negative life events, we often walk away with negative self-talk, feelings, and body sensations. With the help of EMDR, I can aid in letting go of this emotional baggage so you can start living a a more free, balanced life.

— Devan Briggs, Licensed Professional Counselor in Glendale, AZ
 

I have been trained and practicing EMDR through EMDRIA for 4 years. EMDR can be helpful for a variety of issues.

— Mariah Jeremiah, Clinical Social Worker in LAS VEGAS, NV

I have been fully trained in EMDR and provide this service to heal from traumatic experiences. Whether you are suffering from PTSD or find yourself struggling to get past painful life events, this technique will allow you to move forward, reduce symptoms, and create a healthier life.

— Ciara Bogdanovic, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Beverly Hills, CA
 

I am trained and have expertise in EMDR Therapy. EMDR is extremely helpful in healing any kind of trauma. I have experienced tremendous healing in just one session of EMDR. When we experience negative life events, we often walk away with negative self-talk, feelings, and body sensations. With the help of EMDR, I can aid in letting go of this emotional baggage so you can start living a a more free, balanced life.

— Devan Briggs, Licensed Professional Counselor in Glendale, AZ

EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) is a psychotherapy that enables people to heal from the symptoms and emotional distress that are the result of disturbing life experiences. Studies and my experience show EMDR therapy people can experience the benefits of psychotherapy that once took years to make a difference. This treatment can be used for trauma, anxiety, life stressors and more. EMDR is my primary treatment modality

— Deena Patel, Clinical Social Worker in Brooklyn, NY
 

EMDR is an evidence-based practice, and one of only two that are accepted by the Veterans Administration for the treatment of PTSD. EMDR helps your brain go through the natural process of healing from traumatic memories in a relatively short amount of time. For some, EMDR is life-changing.

— Stacy Andrews, Mental Health Counselor in Colorado Springs, CO

I am trained in EMDR and utilize this technique, at least in part, with almost every client I work with. EMDR can offer a non-verbal way to process through through trauma, anxiety, depression, physical pain, and many other mental health concerns. EMDR is unique in that you are able to make quick and sustainable change without having to verbally discuss uncomfortable thoughts or memories.

— Nicole Benedict, Creative Art Therapist in Rochester, NY