EMDR

Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) relies on a client's own rapid, rhythmic eye movements, and is founded on the belief that these eye movements can weaken the intensity of emotionally charged memories. EMDR is most often used to treat PTSD or other traumas, but is also sometimes used for panic attacks, eating disorders, addictions, and anxiety. EMDR sessions can last up to 90 minutes, and usually starts with a client rating their level of distress. A therapist then typically moves their fingers in front of your face (or sometimes toe tapping or musical tones), asking you to follow along with your eyes, while you recall a traumatic event and all the sensations that come with it. You will gradually be guided by the therapist to shift thoughts from the traumatic experience to a more comforting one. The goal of EMDR is to make disturbing memories less immobilizing. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s EMDR specialists today.

Need help finding the right therapist?
Find Your Match

Meet the specialists

 

Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing or "EMDR" is extremely helpful Research has shown EMDR therapy to be effective in treating PTSD, depression, anxiety, addiction and more. EMDR helps you process through debilitating thoughts and beliefs you've struggled with as a result of past experiences. EMDR helps get "stuck" memories "unstuck" so that you can move on with your life and stop living in the past.

— Julie Holburn, Counselor in Boulder, CO

I've found eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy, effective to reduce symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. As an individual who has experienced EMDR treatment, I was able to process past traumatic events in a short amount of time. Not everyone is the same due to the complexity and severity of trauma, through my years in practice, I have seen many patients find a sense of relief and calm after completing EMDR. To learn more, Let’s Talk.

— Raymond Castilleja Jr., Licensed Clinical Social Worker
 

EMDR therapy provides a framework for safely and effectively diminishing the emotional and behavioral impact of traumatic events. We work with you to build your inner resources to address the traumatic material. Once these inner resources are established, we provide a therapeutic structure for you to process the hurt, fear, anger, or sadness and integrate more helpful ways of thinking about the past.

— Julianna Taillon, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Fullerton, CA

I am an EMDR-trained therapist and use EMDR(Eye-movement Desensitization and Reprocessing therapy) as a treatment modality to help clients overcome symptoms and work through their traumas.

— Blanca Kleinfall, Licensed Professional Counselor
 

I have taken 40 hours of training and 10 hours of consultation to become EMDR Trained in order to help the brain quickly reprocess trauma wounds that fuel the incongruence behind negative core beliefs we have about ourselves. I am currently in the extensive process of becoming EMDR Certified

— Claudia Mattox, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Magnolia, TX

I offer EMDR as well as Accelerated Resolution Therapy..which is another eye movement based therapy that provides fast results (in as little as one session.)

— Mikah Watford, Licensed Professional Counselor in San antonio, TX
 

I completed a 5-day intensive EMDRIA training for EMDR and have experience conducting the process with several clients.

— Loren Schouest, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Birmingham, AL

EMDR therapy is a unique physiological therapy utilized to treat PTSD, stress, trauma, painful memories and negative beliefs. EMDR specifically targets traumas that have been “locked” in the brain, but can also be used for events that are not considered trauma in the traditional sense, such as ongoing teasing while in school, chronic childhood illness, etc.

— Shiran Cohen, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in , FL
 

I have completed the required training in order to be certified as an EMDR therapist. I am able to implement the EMDR tools in session alongside the other theories and tools in order to address trauma and other related symptoms.

— Aaron Kelsay, Counselor in Portland, OR

EMDRIA trained therapist through ConnectEMDR intensive training

— Camden Huber, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Winter Park, FL
 

I've found eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy, effective to reduce symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. As an individual who has experienced EMDR treatment, I was able to process past traumatic events in a short amount of time. Not everyone is the same due to the complexity and severity of trauma, through my years in practice, I have seen many patients find a sense of relief and calm after completing EMDR. To learn more, Let’s Talk.

— Raymond Castilleja Jr., Licensed Clinical Social Worker

This is a therapy involving eye movement or bilateral stimulation (a way of stimulating both hemispheres of the brain) to re-process trauma.

— Miranda Millican, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Diego, CA
 

I am a Certified EMDR practitioner and trained with the EMDR Institute.

— Robin Friedman, Clinical Social Worker in White Plains, NY

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing is a major part of my practice and can be used to treat a variety of issues from anxiety to childhood or relational trauma.

— Robyn Trimborn, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX
 

If you believe that what's bothering you in the present comes from your past, EMDR might be a good fit for you. When you are in a stressful or traumatic situation (as a child or as an adult), your brain can't process all the information. In EMDR, we go back and look at the memory with your "adult self" in charge to see it a different way, so you can feel free from the negative cycle it's causing. Check out this video on my website if you're curious to know more: https://bravespacesd.com/emdr

— Colleen Hennessy, Licensed Professional Counselor in , CA

I have completed training in Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy and incorporate this effective and evidence-based therapy into a wholistic approach to treating individuals who have suffered from various types of trauma and or abusive relationships.

— Amy Burley, Licensed Professional Counselor in Plano, TX
 

I was trained in EMDR 18 years ago. My first training was with the founder, Dr Francine Shapiro. It is a very transformative modality.

— Tracy Galluppi, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Raritan, NJ

EMDR is by far the most powerful clinical tool I have as a therapist. I have seen it change lives quicker and more effectively than any other modality. It eliminates so many barriers experienced in talk therapy, and is a resounding example of the importance of mind-body connection in healing.

— Anne Brady, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Columbus, OH