Emotionally Focused Therapy

Emotionally focused therapy (EFT) – or emotionally focused couples therapy as it is sometimes known – is a short-term therapy technique focused on adult relationships. EFT seeks to help clients better understand both their own emotional responses and those of significant people in their lives. A therapist using EFT will look for patterns in the relationship and identify methods to create a more secure bond, increase trust, and help the relationship grow in a healthy direction. In a session, the therapist will observe the interactions between clients, tie this behavior into dynamics in the home, and help guide new interactions based on more open feelings. Sometimes, this includes clients discovering more emotions and feelings than they were aware they had. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of

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Meet the specialists

 

Nearly 10 years of clinical experience and advanced training in Emotionally Focused Therapy.

— Ross Kellogg, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Graduate training in EFT through university, as well as additional CEU certificates and workshops in EFT and treating couples.

— Alyssa Doberstein, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Raleigh, NC
 

My approach to therapy is authentic, relational, and trust based. I believe in the power of attachment, our need to be accepted, and in our longing for authentic personal connection with others. I have received advanced training in Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) and am currently working towards the designation of Certified Emotionally Focused Therapist.

— Jason Powell, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Birmingham, MI

When we suppress or numb our emotions we don't get to pick and choose the ones we want to feel, they all get suppressed. Emotions are information and they are often trying to tell us important things. Recognizing and sitting with our emotions is a practice that we can get better at; allowing us to move deeper into our understanding of ourselves and others.

— Lindsay Anderson, Professional Counselor Associate in , OR
 

I often work from an Emotion Focused Therapy perspective. Through this approach, we work together to deepen awareness of emotions, feelings and experiences that might be getting in your way, or making you feel stuck. Exploring these emotions in a safe space with deep compassion, can often be very meaningful and freeing, allowing for new insights and renewed sense of grounding, and peace in how you want to be in the world.

— Arah Erickson, Professional Counselor Associate in Portland, OR

My approach to meeting with clients has been deeply influenced by the work of Sue Johnson with Emotionally Focused Therapy, a highly researched and validated, evidence-based model. We'll work together to help you and your partner repair your ability to trust each other again and feel deeply connected.

— Marla Mathisen, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Convenient and effective online relationship therapy in Park City, Salt Lake and everywhere across Utah, UT
 

Grief is another common reaction to chronic illness. Various stages of grief including denial, bargaining, anger, and sadness. You may feel you're on a roller coaster of emotion—accepting one day and angry the next. EFT incorporates elements of experiential therapy such as gestalt and person-centered approaches, systemic therapy, and attachment theory. The goal of using this approach for me is to: de-escalate, restructure interactions, and consolidate one's time spent experiencing symptoms.

— Dana Fears, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Tigard, OR

My approach to meeting with clients has been deeply influenced by the work of Sue Johnson with Emotionally Focused Therapy, a highly researched and validated, evidence-based model. We'll work together to help you and your partner repair your ability to trust each other again and feel deeply connected.

— Marla Mathisen, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Online sessions for individuals & couples across Florida, FL
 

Emotion-Focused Therapy (EFT) is a powerful approach that helps individuals and couples identify, understand, and express their emotions. It's particularly effective in improving communication and emotional intimacy.

— Alex Osias, Psychotherapist in Boulder, CO

In 2023 I completed a training in EFT for use in couples. This modality is based off attachment theory and works to help the couple understand what influences their behavior and reactions towards their partner. It creates deeper understanding and meaning in your relationship and gives you the tools to more effectively navigate conflict with one another.

— Amy Ballheimer, Licensed Professional Counselor in Ellisville, MO
 

Since finding EFT I have become committed to growing in this model. I have taken the four day externship, am currently in core skills and participate in both supervision and consultation.

— Christina Hughes, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in SAN FRANCISCO, CA

In my work with couples, I draw on Emotionally Focused Therapy, in conjunction with the Gottman Method Couples Therapy, having received advanced training in both.

— Tomoko Iimura, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in ,
 

Our emotional state shapes the way we think and interpret our life experiences. Discovering there is no emotional experience that does not have a benefit can help you unlock your best life journey.

— Sheldon Kay, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Duluth, GA

Primary focus of practice, hundreds of hours of experience, and years of effective work with wonderful clients! See rest of my profile for additional information or contact me for more info.

— Jacqueline Warner, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Boston, MA
 

Couples and intimate partners all have patterns in the way that they relate based on their early attachment histories. EFT uses present-moment experience to become more aware of these usually unconscious ways of relating and help partners find more connection by communicating more vulnerably and directly to each other.

— Sarah Howeth, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR

My practice focuses more on processing emotions, in a multitude of ways, so people feel better.

— Sonia Kersevich, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Greenbelt, MD