Gestalt Therapy

Gestalt therapy is a therapeutic approach with a focus on personal responsibility that helps clients focus on the present and understand what is happening in their lives right now. Gestalt therapy aims to help clients focus on their current circumstances with fresh eyes to understand their situation. It is based on the concept that we are all best understood when viewed through our own eyes in the present. If working through issues related to a past experience, for example, rather than just talking about the experience, a Gestalt therapist might have a client re-enact it to re-experience the scenario and analyze it with new tools. During the re-enactment, the therapist might guide the analysis by asking how the client feels about the situation now, in order to increase awareness and accept the consequences of one's own behavior. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s Gestalt therapy experts today.

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Fritz Pearls defined neurosis as "The inability to see the obvious". He was the founding Father of Gestalt therapy, which is a depth psychology. Clients turn their gaze inwardly and release "incomplete Gestalten", or wounded inner material. Since we are all multidimensional, we must clear out each level we encounter. These wounds are just contracted energy being held in the body. As we do this, we become more whole. Our heart opens up and we become the person we truly are.

— Robert Teister, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Ballard, WA

Nearly seven years of clinical experience using gestalt therapy.

— Ross Kellogg, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

Gestalt is a way of understanding human experience and the process of change. According to Gestalt, change only happens when we accept ourselves exactly as we are. By paying close attention to the present moment, we discover both new and familiar aspects of ourselves and unlock new possibilities for choice and growth. I receive ongoing training through Gestalt Therapy Training Center Northwest, as well as regular individual supervision and consultation.

— Lucius Wheeler, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in Ashland, OR

“Gestalt therapy is about helping people become aware of what they do and how they do it, and to encourage living in the present, to ‘be here now,’ and make better choices.” – Violet Oaklander. In Gestalt therapy, I use talk or play to help you or your child experience, explore, and process thoughts, feelings and sensations to bring greater awareness, self-understanding and empowerment. I am not an ‘expert’ but a partner on your journey, in the process with you every step of the way.

— Michelle Sargent, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in VALLEY VILLAGE, CA
 

I focus on the here and now, understanding the past exists, but not allowing the to define your future.

— Candice N. Crowley, LPC, Licensed Professional Counselor in Cincinnati, OH

The interactive, experiential, present-moment nature of Gestalt Therapy has been my guiding framework since I first became a therapist. I've utilized and created my own Gestalt experiments that bring clients into a direct experience of healing in many varied contexts. My supervisor is Joan Rieger, Director the Gestalt Institute of the Rockies.

— Dan Halpern, Licensed Professional Counselor in Lafayette, CO
 

Ongoing training with Pacific Gestalt Institute

— Olga Goodman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker

Gestalt therapy brings both psychodynamic therapy and somatic therapy together, acting as the bridge to the present-moment. While somatic therapy is the healing part of therapy, the present-moment is where the healing happens.

— Lindsay Perry, Licensed Professional Counselor in Bellaire, TX
 

Gestalt therapy is a humanistic and whole-bodied modality that centers the client's unique experience of the world. It is closely related to mindfulness in that present-moment awareness of sensations, feelings, and thoughts are central to healing. Additionally, Gestalt highlights playfulness and relationality in the therapeutic process.

— John Moletress, Psychotherapist in Philadelphia, PA

It can help you increase your awareness of what you are experiencing (psychically and emotionally) in each moment.

— Marc Campbell, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in ,
 

Gestalt therapy is a relational kind of therapy that focuses on your life here and now. It emphasizes your strengths and accepting yourself the way you are. Gestalt therapy is also creative, helping you to work on your issues via different kinds of experiments. Gestalt therapy with me is lively, interactive and engaging. We will focus on options more than obstacles, the present more than the past, and strengths more than weaknesses.

— Cindy Blank-Edelman, Mental Health Counselor in Cambridge, MA

Gestalt Therapy helps you resolve past conflicts and learn to live in the present. By focusing attention on your inner self, you can release worries about the past or the future and engage with the present. When you move from beyond the past, you can find peace in each moment and enrich your interactions in the world around you. Dream work, day dreams and daily events can be used to explore unconscious imprints that with a change in attitude can improve the quality of your life.

— Daniel Pagano, PhD, Psychoanalyst in NY, NY
 

In therapy there is a potential to get lost in the story, and to disassociate from the experience. My training in Gestalt, paired with mindfulness, emphasizes what is happening in the current moment to give freedom from the stored pain and trauma in the body. I have received coaching and training in using Gestalt techniques in group and individual therapy.

— Marc Heuser, Counselor in Golden, CO

I am a graduate of the Gestalt Institute of New England. I have four years of postgraduate training in Gestalt psychotherapy.

— Cindy Blank-Edelman, Mental Health Counselor in Cambridge, MA
 

Each of us has the parts of ourselves that we are aware of, and all the parts we have hidden away. Often these parts are in conflict, trying to keep us safe and get our needs met. In psychotherapy, we pay attention in the moment to what is happening for you. Using the process, we will creatively co-create opportunities to hear and connect to the other parts of yourself, to allow your fuller self to emerge and create new meaning for your life.

— Sarah Peace, Licensed Professional Counselor in Culver City, CA

I am a Certified Gestalt Therapist and trained at the Gestalt Associates for Psychotherapy 4 year Clinical Fellowship Program.

— Robin Friedman, Clinical Social Worker in White Plains, NY
 

I am a graduate of the Gestalt Institute of New England. I have four years of postgraduate training in Gestalt psychotherapy.

— Cindy Blank-Edelman, Mental Health Counselor in Cambridge, MA