Interpersonal Neurobiology (IPNB)

Developed by Dr. Dan Siegel, interpersonal neurobiology is a field of study that looks to identify the similar patterns that arise from separate approaches to knowledge. Interpersonal neurobiology combines research from multiple areas into a framework that examines the common findings in an effort to understand human experience. Anthropology, Biology, computer science, linguistics, math, physics, psychology and psychiatry all contribute to Dr. Siegel’s interpersonal neurobiology theory. Therapists applying IPNB principles typically take a mindfulness approach to treatment that promotes compassion, kindness, resilience, and well-being in the client’s personal life, relationships, and community. Think this approach might work for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s interpersonal neurobiology specialists today.

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I have studied IPNB since 2006 and have integrated the information from many different teachers. I believe that the understanding and insight from IPNB helps to bring compassion to many situations that may have been seen through the lens of shame.

— Karen Lucas, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA

I have studied IPNB since 2006 and have integrated the information from many different teachers. I believe that the understanding and insight from IPNB helps to bring compassion into many situations that may have been seen through the lens of shame.

— Karen Lucas, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA
 

As an ardent yoga & meditation practitioner, I have understood the gravity of how important it is to do whatever I can to purify my own consciousness. However, given my own history of illness & abuse, I also realized that at some point, I cannot walk this path alone. We desperately need others to help us to regulate our nervous systems. Without these beings, both real & imaginal, without practicing often our connections to benevolent beings, we will not be able to heal, let alone thrive. Connect

— Jen-Mitsuke Peters, Mental Health Counselor in Denver, CO

I've taken Dr. Dan Seigel's comprehensive course on Interpersonal Neurobiology (IPNB). IPNB is a framework that looks across multiple disciplines that study the mind, brain & relationships, & how all three of these interact to shape who we are, & then how to promote optimal well-being – including non-judgmental insight into yourself, and acceptance, empathy, kindness, compassion & freedom for self & others.

— Brian La Roy Jones, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Walnut Creek, CA
 

My goal is to promote compassion, kindness, resilience, and well-being in our personal lives, our relationships, and our communities. In an individual’s mind, integration involves the linkage of separate aspects of mental processes such as thought with feeling, bodily sensation with logic. In a relationship, integration entails each person’s being respected for his or her autonomy and differentiated self while at the same time being linked to others in empathic communication.

— Sonya DeWitt, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Spokane, WA

As an ardent yoga & meditation practitioner, I understood the gravity of purifying my own consciousness. However, given my own history of illness & abuse, I also realized that at some point, I can't walk this path alone. We all desperately need others to help us to regulate our nervous systems. Without practicing our connections to benevolent beings, real & imaginal, we will not be able to heal, let alone thrive. Connection is absolutely essential, but access to it is not obvious...

— Jen-Mitsuke Peters, Mental Health Counselor in Denver, CO
 

Interpersonal Neurobiology is designed to help people understand their emotions and general life functioning within the context of multiple professional disciplines. IPNB psychotherapy involves integrating knowledge from disciplines as diverse as computer science, sociology, anthropology, linguistics, mental health and several others. Each discipline contributes a unique set of knowledge that help us live an integrative and fulfilling life.

— John Edwards, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Oakland, CA
 

Interpersonal Neurobiology explains how reparative relationships have the power to heal relational trauma. We're ultimately who we are because of our relationships. The most intimate ones, with primary caregivers or romantic partners, literally shape our brain. We used to think early experiences defined us, but now we know our brain in constantly being reshaped by new relationships. Therapy can change our brain's response to fear & threat, offering hope & healing to CPTSD survivors.

— Smadar Salzman, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

I incorporate Brain-Based Therapy and Practical Neuroscience to improve attachment, emotional regulation, distress tolerance, mindful practices, and memory reconsolidation which is faster than just traditional talk therapy.

— Nichole Oliver LPC, NCC, CCTP, Licensed Professional Counselor in CHESTERFIELD, MO

The power to heal rests in relationships, our nervous system is wired to become stronger and more adaptive when we can experience ourselves in connection to others. This approach deeply informs parents on how to co-regulate with their children, no matter the age, and partners how to self regulate their emotions while remaining loving and caring with the other person. Through the use of mindfulness we can together access to a more connected experience of life.

— Silvia Gozzini, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in PORTLAND, OR
 

I strongly believe that each person in the relationship is a rich source of information, and it is well known that within us all are innate neurological systems that signal to us safety or danger within relationships. Attuning to these systems, in ourselves, in one another, and within the relationship, often elicits lasting healing. Thus, you will find me watching what is happening between us quite closely as a means toward therapeutic intervention and change.

— Chris Perry, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Sammamish, WA

My style of counseling draws on interpersonal neurobiology (IPNB) which uses clinical evidence that supports continuous brain growth as its foundation. To make positive changes, we can start by looking at ourselves. You’ll be able to discuss what’s present for you and I’ll accept and support you without judgment.

— Mark Stouffer, Professional Counselor Associate in Portland, OR
 

I use the psycho-education of interpersonal neurobiology, as well as the experience and mindful study of what is happening as we are in relationship during sessions.

— Jenni Goldstein, Licensed Professional Counselor in , OR