Psychodynamic Therapy

Psychodynamic therapy is a therapeutic treatment that primarily focuses on the interpretation of mental and emotional processes. It shares much in common with psychoanalysis and is often considered a simpler, less time consuming alternative. Like psychoanalysis, psychodynamic therapy seeks to reveal the unconscious content of a client's psyche in an effort to alleviate psychic tension. Psychodynamic therapy increases a client’s self-awareness and grows their understanding of the influence of the past on present behavior. It allows clients to examine unresolved conflicts and symptoms that arise from past experiences and explore how they are manifesting themselves in current behaviors, such as the need and desire to abuse substances. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s psychodynamic therapy experts today.

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Meet the specialists

 

While I integrate elements of mindfulness and CBT, my therapeutic style is primarily relational.

— Jodie Deignan, Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner in White Plains, NY

I am a member of the Northwest Alliance for Psychoanalytic Study, where I have completed additional training in self-psychology, relational psychodynamic theory, and other psychodynamic therapies. I also participate in a mentorship group that is psychodynamically oriented.

— Chanel Brown, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate
 

Why psychodynamic/analytic therapy? The here and now psychotherapy relationship opens a stunning window into past, present, and future; into the deep wisdom of the unconscious; and into a creative flexibility that brings more and more wholesomeness, freedom, intimacy, and flourishing of the soul. I have doctoral and postdoctoral training in various contemporary analytic approaches, and I practice from a liberatory, feminist, relational stance.

— Aleisa Myles, Psychologist in Media, PA

I have worked from a relational psychodynamic therapist for over 16 years, which is also known as intersubjectivity, or the idea that we heal in relationship with others. I focus on authenticity, transparency and connection as we collaboratively decide how to focus your time in treatment. Relational psychodynamic therapy investigates root causes of your symptoms and attempts to understand them in a holistic manner so that you can live a more intentional life.

— Geneva Reynaga-Abiko, Clinical Psychologist in Washington, DC
 

The goal of psychodynamic therapy is to assist clients understand how past events in their childhood are affecting their adult lives, by shaping their personality. Through the therapy process I expose clients to different aspects of their lives, especially how they attract/interact with others, and how this impacts and generates spikes of anxiety in their lives. Problems like depression, anxiety, anger and social isolation can all be successfully treated and improved using psychodynamic Therapy

— Filippo M. Forni, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

This is where Western therapy really began! Psychodynamic theory has grown and developed since its inception, but its emphasis on the importance of childhood experiences, the unconscious, dream analysis, and client insight remain relevant. I trained for just under 1.5 years in the Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Training Program (PPTP). I was also a fellow at the Minnesota Psychoanalytic Society and Institute, where I implemented psychodynamic psychotherapy in a low-fee clinic.

— Shae Loucks, Psychotherapist
 

The relationship between the therapist is important for change and I utilize this therapy with every client I work with.

— Mary Ann Wertz, Licensed Professional Counselor in Denver, CO

Psychodynamic therapy offers that much of what influences our decisions and relationships exists outside of our day to day awareness - the unconscious. Our work is to bring the unconscious into consciousness. As the poet David Whyte says, we must learn to let the mute parts of our body speak. In session we follow emotions, building a shared language to map what happens in your internal world, we spend time with sensations arising in you body, and what may come in your dream life.

— Andrew Fontana, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in Seattle, WA
 

Your mind is complex and it is worth being curious about. Genuine change takes place within sincere relationships. Psychodynamic therapy helps people be able to use their willpower in ways that are productive. It also helps them learn from ways they try to help themselves that actually lead to more pain and frustration. It is supportive, honest, engaged, active, and oftentimes scary yet freeing. Research has repeatedly demonstrated it is the therapy of choice for people that want to reduce their symptoms in a lasting way.

— Reid Kessler, Psychologist in Encinitas, CA

I believe in the importance of how we were brought up including the circumstances of our family in the broader social context as an important influence in how we are in our current lives. When I was in training in the 1970's this was the standard treatment approach.

— Karin Wandrei, Clinical Social Worker in Rohnert Park, CA
 

I have extensive training in the theories of analytical psychology; I draw from the work of CG Jung as well as the post Jungian. I also combine my interest in wholistic theories that interweave mind and body.

— Dominique Yarritu, Marriage & Family Therapist in San Jose, CA

Psychodynamic therapy helps to identify where you're struggling. It can help you see yourself and those around you more clearly to promote self-awareness.

— Lindsay Perry, Licensed Professional Counselor in Bellaire, TX
 

My training in interpersonal psychodynamic therapy informs the way I'm observing the therapeutic relationship we build together. Not only will I listen to the content you share with me, but I'm also listening for the 'music' behind it--the 'why' of choices, the 'how' of events, and the 'why now' of what comes up in our co-created space. I offer the associations and images that come up for me so we can examine the in-between of our dynamic and be curious together.

— Gretchen Phillips, Counselor

Psychodynamic psychotherapy refers to an approach and theory that assumes that early life experience informs and shapes our current relationships and emotional state. It is loosely related to the theory and practice of psychoanalysis (see below). In psychodynamic therapy, the relationship and interaction with the therapist is seen as a primary mode of effecting positive or developmental change. Therapy tends to involve exploration of both current as well as past experiences, often uncovering aspects of a persons thoughts and emotions that were not fully realized or understood. It is through this new understanding and emotional exploration that negative or stuck states of mind and/or relationships are healed, resolved or developed.

— Bear Korngold, Clinical Psychologist in San Francisco, CA
 

Psychodynamic therapy is effective for a wide range of mental health symptoms and focuses on the way our unconscious manifests through present behavior. Through talk-therapy, one of the primary treatment goals is to cultivate self-awareness and better understand how experiences of the past influence present thought patterns and behavior. This includes analyzing and verbalizing past experiences and traumas in an open and direct way and may also include the interpretation of symbols and metaphors.

— Feliz Lucia Molina, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Los Angeles, CA

By examining past experiences and seeing how they connect to the present, you can become more here-and-now focused and no longer be stuck in the past. Talk therapy that includes the past has been found to be extremely beneficial for many issues.

— Patrick Tully, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

The goal of psychodynamic therapy is to assist clients understand how past events in their childhood are affecting their adult lives, by shaping their personality. Through the therapy process I expose clients to different aspects of their lives, especially how they attract/interact with others, and how this impacts and generates spikes of anxiety in their lives. Problems like depression, anxiety, anger and social isolation can all be successfully treated and improved using psychodynamic therapy.

— Filippo M. Forni, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA