Spirituality

The term spirituality has evolved and broadened over time and typically refers to a sense of connection to something bigger than ourselves. Spirituality is an expansive and wide-ranging concept encompassing many points of view. It often involves a search for meaning in life. Although it means different things to different people, spirituality can play an important role in helping people address mental health issues and maintain good mental health generally. A spiritual practice can help individuals stay grounded and provide a framework for coping with stress. If you are interested in expressing or exploring your spirituality as a part of therapy, reach out to one of TherapyDen’s spirituality experts today.

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I believe that, broadly speaking, spirituality is a concern for everyone. The big picture and the largest questions of life are contained in it. What do you value? What do you worship? As David Foster Wallace said, "there is no such thing as not worshipping. Everybody worships. The only choice we get is what to worship...If you worship money and things, if they are where you tap real meaning in life, then you will never have enough, never feel you have enough."

— Phillip Coulson, Therapist in Seattle, WA

The importance of spirituality in ones life can help a person cope through difficult times. I want to help you use your own spirituality to help you and only if you want to use spirituality. I want you to be able to use practices that help you to find hope and healing in your life.

— Aaron Mussat, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Kansas City, MO
 

During our time together, we will explore beliefs and practices related to meaning, existence, and spiritual health and healing. I often speak about spirituality in terms of the Universe and our connection to ourselves and the connection to something larger than ourselves. I will support you in exploring what your unique sense of spirituality means to you.

— Mallory Kroll, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Concord, MA

Please note that patients who have no desire to integrate spirituality into their counseling will not receive pressure from Dr. Braun to adopt her spiritual views. For individuals who are desiring to have their Christian faith integrated into counseling, services will be provided that integrate both psychological treatments based upon evidence-based research for the treatment of the condition for which they are needing care as well as Christian principles from their faith to support healing.

— Jane Braun, Psychologist in Palos Heights, IL
 

Spirituality is best understood as our sense of being fully human, experiencing ourselves as a part of life, not an object in isolation. Healthy spirituality doesn't require a theistic understanding, and having a theistic understanding doesn't guarantee us feeling fully human. I am a respectful and knowledgable therapist for those not interested in religion, religious minorities, AND those who seek a more meaningful connection to their own mainstream religion.

— Christine Bates, Licensed Professional Counselor in Oxford, MS

As a Clinical Trauma Professional (CCTP) I support those navigating the complexities of religious trauma or deconstructing beliefs. If you're on a journey to discover your authentic self, rewrite values, or heal from past harms, let's embark on this transformative process together and reclaim peace and authenticity. Let's embark on this transformative process together and reclaim peace and authenticity.

— Ashlyn Zinck, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Chicago, IL
 

This is my strongest area of interest, as my own spirituality has provided the greatest source of inspiration in my life. I have found cultivating presence and the ability to be with rather than turn away from suffering to be the ultimate healers. I have a graduate degree in Eastern Philosophy, a certificate in Reiki, and many years of experience in India with time spent with an awakened being.

— Janaki Tremaglio, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Seattle, WA

I believe that, broadly speaking, spirituality is a concern for everyone. The big picture and the largest questions of life are contained in it. What do you value? What do you worship? As David Foster Wallace said, "there is no such thing as not worshipping. Everybody worships. The only choice we get is what to worship...If you worship money and things, if they are where you tap real meaning in life, then you will never have enough, never feel you have enough."

— Phillip Coulson, Therapist in Seattle, WA
 

I believe the integration of one's Christian faith can allow therapy to be more effective, which is something I myself have experienced in my own healing journey. But I welcome those from other faith backgrounds and completely respect those who wish to leave their faith at the door.

— Janae Kim, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist

Patients who have no desire to integrate spirituality into their counseling will not receive pressure from Dr. Braun to adopt her spiritual views. Counseling, in these cases, will rely strictly upon psychological principles found in evidenced based research and traditional psychological therapies for the treatment of the problem for which they are seeking help. For individuals who are desiring to have their Christian faith integrated into counseling, integrative services will be provided

— Jane Braun, Psychologist in Palos Heights, IL
 

As a former Catholic, I know what it's like to feel stuck in guilt, shame, and low self-worth caused by a restrictive religious belief system and community. I can help you step out of the mental traps that keep you stuck and move towards a life free to focus on what matters to you. Let's work together to unlearn shaming self-talk, people-pleasing, and self-abandonment so that you can start to support and care for yourself, do what matters to you, and feel like a whole person.

— Ashley Hamm, Licensed Professional Counselor in Houston, TX

I believe that, broadly speaking, spirituality is a concern for everyone. The big picture and the largest questions of life are contained in it. What do you value? What do you worship? As David Foster Wallace wrote, "there is no such thing as not worshipping. Everybody worships. The only choice we get is what to worship...If you worship money and things, if they are where you tap real meaning in life, then you will never have enough, never feel you have enough."

— Phillip Coulson, Therapist in Seattle, WA
 

I work with clients to explore and develop rich spiritual lives. I approach this work from a non-denominational perspective with the aim of investigating the psychological mechanisms that are present in religious and spiritual experiences. I hope to help clients refine their sense of self-in-the-world, where they can reassess their values and what determines a meaningful life.

— Peter Paul, Psychotherapist in New York, NY

I offer support to persons who have left or are thinking about leaving high-control cultic groups. Many of these are religious in nature. Education and support can help you transition into "the world" and cope with shunning. I also offer support to those who are concerned about a loved one's group membership.

— Cathy S Harris, Counselor in San Diego, CA
 

My master's degree included special training to support clients who would like to integrate the strengths of their faith tradition into their healing process. I also have experience working with individuals who have experienced religious trauma, including clergy abuse.

— Meghan Meros, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor

How do you understand your place in the universe? Whether we are atheist, agnostic, religious, spiritual, or recovering from religion trauma, we all grapple with who we are in this world and how to find meaning and purpose. My graduate degree specialization is in mindfulness-based transpersonal counseling, and I utilize a variety of approaches in secular Buddhist and transpersonal psychology to help you define your sense of spirituality (or lack thereof) on your own terms.

— Julie Osburne, Associate Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

My theoretical orientation is transpersonal, which translates to "beyond the self." Transpersonal psychology marries humanistic psychology with spiritual, transcendant, or unseen aspects of the human experience. In therapy with me, this orientation means that I will honor and accept all of your lived experience, as well as incorporate it into your healing. Want to use tarot cards to help conceptualize yourself? Sure! Have intuitive gifts that you don't want to feel judged for? Count me in!

— Breanna Swanson, Psychotherapist in Seattle, WA

I have a passion for helping clients navigate what their own spirituality looks like and how they can incorporate it into their lives. I have experience with helping clients overcome religious trauma and explore and cultivate their own unique connection to themselves and others -- no matter what that looks like. I rely on my own spirituality to guide me in work with clients and offer a warm and open space to explore beliefs and connection to oneself and others!

— Callie Seymour, Marriage & Family Therapist in Austin, TX
 

I love integrating an individual's personal spirituality into session. I truly believe in treating mind, body, and spirit together. My clients utilize this opportunity in all different ways. From integrating their spiritual beliefs into IFS parts work, to creating meaning from past trauma, to deeply exploring the client's unique spiritual experiences in this lifetime and beyond, this aspect of therapy is individually tailored to the client's comfort level and needs.

— Lara Dubowchik, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Highland Park, NJ