Attachment Theory

Attachment theory, first developed by John Bowlby, is a psychology concept focused on the importance of attachment in relation to personal development. According to Bowlby’s theory, attachment is not a one-time event, but an ongoing process that begins at birth and continues through the first years of life. Fundamental to attachment theory is the belief that a child's relationship with the primary caregiver (usually the mother), affects their attachment style for the rest of their life. Unresolved or insecure attachment issues experienced in early childhood can have a negative impact on relationships into adulthood. A therapist who specializes in attachment theory can help.  Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s experts today!

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As humans we are biologically wired to attach to our parents when we are babies. How we experience this attunement of safety, love and connection stays with us through our childhood and into adulthood. We unconsciously carry our attachment style into relationships as adults. The main styles of attachment are anxious, avoidant, disorganized and secure. In healthy relationships both adults strive for secure attachment, but attachment injuries from childhood or past relationships can prevent se

— Rachel Boyle, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist Intern

I believe that the framework for the relationships that we saw & experienced growing up influences how we approach & feel secure in our romantic relationships.

— MacKenzie Knapp, Marriage & Family Therapist in Tacoma, WA
 

As an attachment therapist, I am well versed in the needs of babies and children and the ways these create trauma and future problems as adults. If our parents did not teach our brains how to regulate our emotions, we do not magically gain these skills later, and often experience trauma or anxiety as a result. In couples & parenting work I help couples/parents recognize and unlearn the attachment styles they learned as children showing up in their relationship to be effective partners & parents.

— Linnea Logas, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in Minneapolis, MN

My therapy is Attachment oriented. I use the counseling relationship as the primary vehicle/tool for self-discovery and healing.

— Rachelle Dudley, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Olympia, WA
 

How we felt with our original caregivers can become a blueprint for relationships in our adult lives. Struggling in relationships with others is a common reason why people come to therapy. But the good news is that how we exist with others is a learned behavior--which means it can also be unlearned. Let's partner together to understand your attachment traumas and styles, and from there do work that both honors where you've been and makes room for where you want to go.

— Shae Loucks, Psychotherapist

Attachment theory tends to inform the directions I take with people, particularly if their emotional and psychological struggles are related to relationships in their life. Attachment theory in the most basic sense is about how our early relationships (i.e., experience of parental figures) impacted our development and helped to form relational filters that we still use in our relationships today.

— Nina Tilka, Clinical Psychologist in Costa Mesa, CA
 

We offer Attachment Assessments to help you uncover and explore your attachment style. We also utilize Attachment Theory in psychotherapy to find connections between your early life and difficult present experiences.

— Spaces Therapy, Marriage & Family Therapist in Los Angeles, CA

Our ways of relating to others often stem from unmet needs of the past. Through our work together, we will identify your attachment style and discover how to navigate current relationships successfully, while processing the potential impact of early life experiences.

— Morgan Grace, Psychotherapist in Austin, TX
 

New attachment relationships can be created through the support of therapy which help to heal old attachment wounds.

— Kassondra Wilson, Mental Health Counselor in , WA

Our early relationships give us a sense of whether or not we are safe and welcomed in the world. Whether or not we are worthy of being treated with kindness, love, and respect. Attachment-informed trauma therapy can help to repair the psychological wounds from childhood, providing relief from cycles of shame, blame, guilt, doubt, and emotional overwhelm. Outcomes of healing these early wounds can include improved health, relationships, and boundaries, and reduced anxiety, stress, and depression.

— Kim Torrence, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Rockville, MD
 

I provide Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), the gold standard treatment for child disruptive behaviors. PCIT was developed through UC Davis Children’s Hospital and has been shown by 40 years of research and 100’s of studies to effective for children as young as 12 months and as old as 10 years. A recent study has even shown PCIT to be more effective for disruptive behavior than stimulant medication.

— DC Hamilton, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Claremont, CA

Attachment theory, first developed by John Bowlby, is a psychology concept focused on the importance of attachment in relation to personal development. Fundamental to attachment theory is the belief that a child's relationship with the primary caregiver (usually the mother), affects their attachment style for the rest of their life. Unresolved or insecure attachment issues experienced in early childhood can have a negative impact on relationships into adulthood.

— Soileau Partners Psychotherapy, Psychotherapist in Kansas City, MO
 

Attachment Theory is about discovering that how a person was cared for & related to in their early years still effects them today especially in close relationships. When we were young we learned if the world was safe or not. To make us feel safe we isolated or became people pleasers. These patterns continue on into adulthood & can be very disruptive in all relationships. There are ways to feel emotionally safe so you can thrive.

— Kathleen Thompson, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

My approach to psychotherapy is relationship-based, attachment focused, and compassionate. Research shows the most powerful aspect of the healing process is the relationship that develops between you and your therapist. My goal is for us to address your challenges through open and trusting dialogue. My therapy is humanistic and integrative.

— Amanda Mead, Psychologist
 

I utilize attachment theory to help us understand our positive and negative interpretations of life experiences. "Attachment is a deep and enduring emotional bond that connects one person to another across time and space (Ainsworth, 1973; Bowlby, 1969)." We will look at your childhood attachments and how the influence your life, your child's life, your partner's life now.

— Ashlei Lien, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Inglewood, CA

Much of my work has been with individuals dealing with trauma related to attachment disruptions. I'm a big believer in therapy's potential to provide clients with the kinds of secure attachments that help facilitate regulation of anxiety and growth.

— Christopher Stevenson, Clinical Social Worker in New York, NY
 

Attachment theory is focused on the relationships and bonds between people, particularly long-term relationships, including those between a parent and child and between romantic partners.

— Megan Moeller, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in ,

Our relationship with our selves and others begins with our experience of attachment to our caregivers. Attachment is a huge influential part of our behaviors in relationship with everyone in our lives- our partners, children, parents, families, and friends.

— Sprout Therapy PDX, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

I have a working knowledge of Attachment Theory and utilize this to help you gain understanding and insight into your most important relationships!

— Arielle Emmett, Licensed Resident in Counseling in Blacksburg, VA