Body Image Issues

Body image is how you see yourself when you picture yourself in your mind or when look in the mirror. Most people worry about how we look occasionally or see at least one aspect of our physical appearance we don’t like. But for some, these occasional thoughts can become frequent and disruptive. People with negative body image issues may avoid social situations and experience problems in relationships, depression, anger, anxiety, isolation, self-loathing and/or an obsession with weight loss. Body Dysmorphic Disorder (or BDD) is one example of a body-image disorder, characterized by persistent and intrusive preoccupations with an imagined or slight defect in one's appearance. The good news is that body image can be changed and BDD can be treated. Contact one of TherapyDen’s body image issues experts for help today!

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Meet the specialists

 

Have you ever felt uncomfortable in your own skin? This is a topic often normalized in today's society by creating a "fix it" mentality. If we are experiencing something emotionally, sometimes our bodies are what are focused on. Maybe you have been told or have thought "If I could just fix my body, everything else would be okay." I am here to help validate your emotions and also provide a space for a different narrative to exist. I believe in leaning into this inner narrative with compassion

— Meagan Fischer, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Tyler, TX

Body-oddy -oddy. Let's talk about your relationship with your body without shame. I want to help create a space for you to explore your body's needs and desires. Fat bodies are demonized, and individuals are made to feel that what they have to offer is directly tied to a number on the scale. But listen, there is pride at every size and there is Health at Every Size.

— Arianna Wheat, Creative Art Therapist in Los Angeles, CA
 

I have studied the topic of body image and eating disorders for years. I consistently help my clients to develop compassion for what their bodies hold and have endured throughout their lives. I also help to foster an appreciation in my clients for how their bodies allow them to engage in the world.

— Ashley Eisenlohr, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Associate in Everett, WA

I have advance study in Health at Every Size (HAES) and intuitive eating and run Body Image Support Group.

— Kat Polmear, Therapist in Royal Oak, MI
 

If you struggle with negative body image, body dysmorphia or negative self esteem, I can help you release these negative beliefs and find a new, positive way to relate to your body.

— Janet Wang, Licensed Professional Counselor Associate in , TX

I have been studying and treating disordered body image for most of my career and have been personally interested in fat positivity and body liberation for over a decade. I think that your relationship with food and movement and your relationship with your body often go hand in hand, and I integrate various methods of healing these relationships as we move towards body acceptance (or neutrality if that works best for you) and building a life of meaning, connection, and joy.

— Summer Forlenza, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , CA
 

Weight-neutral, Health At Every Size aligned approach to body liberation

— Heidi Andersen, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor Supervisor in Asheville, NC

I work with clients using a Health At Every Size (HAES) approach to develop a positive body image and form self-nurturing patterns regarding food, eating, movement, and sexuality. In my work, I encourage clients to challenge all forms of oppression. These include oppressions around race, gender, and sexuality as well as about the body.

— Kaye-Ailsa Rowan, Marriage & Family Therapist in San Jose, CA
 

As women, our bodies and the changes that our bodies experience are always up for discussion. From the fluctuating numbers on a scale to feeling like certain body parts are not "appealing enough", we can be left with feelings of shame, frustration and hopelessness towards ourselves. I provide a nonjudgemental space where together, we develop tools in support of building your body confidence and establishing more of a positive relationship with your body.

— Rebecca Brown, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in ,

The goal of CBT is to reduce preoccupation with perceived flaws and help the individual in treatment to develop a more realistic and positive perception of the body. CBT often involves psychoeducation, which aims to help individuals become aware of the nature of body image and of the role that certain factors play in the development of their personal body image. In therapy, individuals may be encouraged to engage in self-monitoring, often by keeping a diary, in order to become more aware of both the negative and positive thoughts and emotions regarding their body, as well as the factors that trigger them. As the therapist, I use cognitive restructuring, to help clients modify thoughts, feelings, and behaviors that may be unhealthy, and clients may become better able to accept and love their bodies as a result.

— Amy Castongia, Counselor in Huntersville, NC
 

I realize how difficult it can be to accept your body, let alone like or love it in today's diet culture & appearance driven society. I also know a way out & are ready to help you get there. Let's stop the body shame, and improve your Body Image using tools including CBT, Self Compassion, Body Neutrality & Functionality, & Mindfulness.

— Audra Coons, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Tampa, FL

I come from a HAES (Health at Every Size) perspective. I believe that "diet culture", which we are surrounded with each day can really cause immense struggles with body image. I will walk with you to come up with strategies and ways to see the beauty that is within.

— Alicia Roeder, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Council Bluffs, IA
 

Too often we are told we are not good enough and we need to change how we look, sound, move etc. Entire businesses run on making us feel less than. In such a cultural environment, being ourselves fully and unapologetically is the best revolution we can engage in. I work with clients using tenets of HAES and Intuitive Eating to create tailored programs of radical self love and body diversity.

— Neil Panchmatia, Counselor in Portland, OR

I practice from a weight-neutral, anti-diet and anti-oppression lens and use Health at Every Size interventions as well. I am all about helping people of all body shapes and sizes be liberated from the harmful weight stigma and fatphobia in our culture, including places where it gets internalized and coping with and fighting against systemic oppression and discrimination. I can help you build a kind, respectful, and mostly peaceful relationship with your body.

— Linda Baggett, Psychologist in Manhattan Beach, CA
 

I am a Health at Every Size (HAES) practitioner and a fierce advocate for body acceptance and liberation. I believe all bodies are good bodies, regardless of size, shape, or ability.

— Kirsten Cannon, Counselor in Memphis, TN

We live in a society that is SO hostile toward those who don't fit the traditional ideal of beauty, which, let's face it, is most of us! Scientific studies have proven time and again that one's health is NOT determined by one's weight, but you'd never know it given mainstream media and the medical establishment. I do NOT promote diets of any kind and work with clients to improve their relationship with food and their bodies using the principles of Health-At-Every-Size and Intuitive Eating.

— Jacqueline 'Jackie' Abeling, Marriage & Family Therapist in ,
 

Do you hate your body? Do you compare yourself to others? Are you terrified of gaining weight? Do you feel shame about your body? Do you feel like you don't fit in? If you respond yes to any of these, we can help! We approach body image from a Health at Every Size(tm) perspective for a reason; you are good enough no matter your size and we want to help you believe that for yourself!

— Food Is Not The Enemy Eating Disorder Services, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR

As women, our bodies and the changes that our bodies experience are always up for discussion. From the fluctuating numbers on a scale to feeling like certain body parts are not "appealing enough", we can be left with feelings of shame, frustration and hopelessness towards ourselves. I provide a nonjudgemental space where together, we develop tools in support of building your body confidence and establishing more of a positive relationship with your body.

— Rebecca Brown, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in ,
 

I am a Health At Every Size advocate. Through journaling exercises and exposure exercises, I help womxn become more comfortable with their bodies. I help clients shift the focus from what they hate about their bodies to what amazing things their bodies do for them. I also work to challenge the unrealistic, Western, thin ideal that has become such a dangerous but predominant narrative in our culture.

— Amanda Wetegrove-Romine, Psychologist in San Antonio, TX