Feminist Therapy

Feminist therapy is a therapeutic approach grounded in feminist theory and philosophy. Central to this approach is the idea that women may experience mental health issues as a result of psychological oppression. In feminist therapy, the therapist and client are equals – the therapist's knowledge of psychology and the client's knowledge of herself come together to embrace the client's strengths. Feminist therapists seek to recognize and understand the client's socioeconomic and political situation, and are typically personally invested in ending oppression, empowering women and girls, and working toward social change. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s feminist therapy specialists today.

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I approach counseling from a Relational-Cultural perspective which is a feminist lens that focuses on developing a positive relationship between you and me to help support the client making positive changes in their life. This growth-fostering relationship can be used as a model to improve all other relationships in the client's life. I will be striving to create a positive connection with you and I will be encouraging you to assess your past relationships and how they may impact you now.

— Carly Stevens, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Seattle, WA

The way I practice therapy is guided by an acute awareness of how strict adherence to gender roles negatively impacts people of all genders. My feminism is trans-inclusive and intersectional, which means that I understand that gender roles and expectations impact people differently based on race, culture, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability status, age, socioeconomic status, and other features of your identity.

— Jennie Steinberg, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Studio City, CA
 

I practice from an intersectional feminist lens, meaning that I take into account how all the parts of your identity (race, sexual orientation, size, faith, roles you occupy, etc.) impact your individual experience of being a woman, including your experiences of oppression. I consider you the expert on you, and me the expert on psychology, and together we partner to combine our expertise in the service of your goals. I seek to empower you to make your own best decisions according to your values.

— Linda Baggett, Psychologist in Manhattan Beach, CA

Forces of societal oppression affect all individuals of any gender background. I am passionate about helping people understand these forces and guiding them in choosing ways to respond in an empowered way. Feminism is a way to explore the way that you feel about yourself and the ways that this shows up in your life. Feminist therapy helps you to gain agency and power in your daily living and alter the ways in which you participate in systems of power that can be hurtful to you.

— Jennie Wang-Hall, Psychologist in San Marcos, CA
 

"Feminism is a movement to end sexism, sexist exploitation, and oppression"--(bell hooks). Feminist therapy is used as a lens to investigate and explore how society is built for white, cis-het (cisgender/heterosexual), assigned male at birth (AMAB) people and the subsequent ramifications and consequences for others who fall out of those parameters. Intersectionality, within feminism, looks at the way differing inequalities create intersecting discrimination and inequity.

— Leta Lawhead, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Bellingham, WA

I was trained the tradition of the Stone Center at Wellesley in what was then called Feminist Therapy, but is now called "Relational Cultural Therapy". This is a strengths based approach that honors not only the specific needs of women but also takes into account the ethnic and cultural backgrounds that shape our worldview. Healing happens in relationships with others, and therapy is a way to practice this.

— Jessica Foley, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Waltham, MA
 

Everything I see I view through the lens of being a lesbian woman in a changing but still extremely sexist society. It impacts the dynamics of everyone's lives. I see empowering women as my purpose for this practice as well as my soul's mission for being here at this time on the planet. Feminist therapy for me has always been about fighting all the "isms" we face. It won't do to be progressive about women but not recognize race, class, gender identity, disability or immigration status.

— Deb Dettman, Clinical Social Worker in SEATTLE, WA

I believe that a large part of the angst that people struggle with has to do with the rules and roles that society puts on us. Change happens through examining how you view yourself in contrast to the narrative that the dominant society has set for you. These roles are often extremely limiting, and often fundamentally traumatizing. Through an egalitarian therapeutic relationship, I work to empower clients to do the work to figure out who you truly are and what type of life you want.

— Marjorie Boggs Vazquez, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA
 

My core values are centered in feminist, anti-oppression ideals (the type of feminism that includes and honors women of color and trans folks). It means every day, I work with folks like you to unlearn socialization of gender, sexuality, and so many other qualities to find out who you really are, or at least who you want to be today. In therapy, we will talk about and examine how this impacts your relationships, sense of worth, and other ways of being in the world.

— Anna McDonald, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in San Francisco, CA

I utilized feminist theory in my therapy approaches

— Aydrelle Collins, Counselor in Dallas, TX
 

I received my training in feminist studies from Cornell University in Ithaca, NY.

— Sam Naimi, Psychoanalyst in West Hollywood, CA

Having a feminist approach to therapy means I believe you to be the expert of your experience. It means I am affirming of marginalized identities, and am interested in building a relationship with you that has a balanced power dynamic. Having a feminist orientation to psychotherapy also means that I have done my own work around my intersectional identities as a white, cis-gendered, able-bodied, queer femme person.

— Mackenzie Studebaker, Associate Marriage & Family Therapist
 

As a feminist therapist, I understand how gender roles and societal expectations can influence our individuality and relationships with others. It can be hard to discern what is your own values and what ideas are prescribed from the outside world. I recognize that these issues affect all of us, regardless of our gender: male, female, non-binary, because we are all subject to loosing our authenticity when we have to perform expectations from others.

— Colleen Hennessy, Licensed Professional Counselor in , CA

I approach my work from a social justice lens, always considering the importance of intersectional oppression in psychological distress.

— Augustin Kendall, Counselor in Minneapolis, MN
 

"Feminism is a movement to end sexism, sexist exploitation, and oppression"--(bell hooks). Feminist therapy is used as a lens to investigate and explore how society is built for white, cis-het (cisgender/heterosexual), assigned male at birth (AMAB) people and the subsequent ramifications and consequences for others who fall out of those parameters. Intersectionality, within feminism, looks at the way differing inequalities create intersecting discrimination and inequity.

— Leta Lawhead, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Bellingham, WA

In my work, I focus on reworking gendered power dynamics with individuals and couples and addressing social inequities that keep partners form being collaborative with one another.

— Alana Ogilvie, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR
 

As a systems therapist, I believe that patriarchy, racism and capitalism have impacted the overall development and accessibility of healing services. I believe there is value in deconstructing the ways we have been impacted by those systems and how we can break down the barriers they create in our lives. I will help you lean into your own self-identity and free you from the pain that oppressive systems have caused you.

— Ashley MacLaren, Counselor in Seattle, WA

I am rooted in anti-oppression as the lens through which we can make sense of many of our struggles. I believe in depathologizing mental illness by correctly identifying external sources of distress rather than seeing your pain as a personal problem. I have and continue to educate myself on systemic and interpersonal oppression in order to better understand the experiences of marginalized clients and to prevent harming my clients through my ignorance.

— Augustin Kendall, Counselor in Minneapolis, MN
 

Modern feminist therapy is not just for women. It seeks to address the concerns of all who have been impacted by systems of oppression (Black, Indigenous, & People of Color, LGBQTIA+, those who are Neurodivergent, Disabled individuals, etc). In order to understand & help those who have been marginalized we must understand those systems & work to dismantle them. I recognize that as a white person who presents as a cisgender heteronormative female, I have unearned privilege.

— Jennifer Dolphin, Licensed Professional Counselor in Anchorage, AK