Grief or Loss

Grief and loss are a part of the human condition. Grief is typically considered to be brought on by the death of a loved one, but can also be triggered by any significant life-altering loss (such as a divorce or the loss of a job). Grief is a natural response to loss, but that doesn’t make it easy to deal with.  Symptoms of grief may include sadness, loneliness, anger, denial, depression and a myriad of other thoughts and feelings.  There is no “normal” amount of time for grief to pass, but if you find that your grief is not improving over time or that it is interfering with your everyday life, you may want to consider seeking professional help. A qualified grief counselor can help you to cope with the physical, emotional, social, spiritual, and cognitive responses to loss. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s grief experts today.

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Loss comes in many shapes and sizes. Grief is not a sign of weakness, nor is it a lack of faith. Know that we don't "move on" from grief, rather, we move forward. Grief changes. It is a passage - not a place to stay. Ultimately, it is the price of love.

— Rachelle Dudley, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Olympia, WA

I have years of experience with grief and loss, both professionally and personally. I have run extensive grief and loss groups.

— Kelly Broderick, Addictions Counselor in Brockton, MA
 

Many clients find me by searching for support after a miscarriage or stillbirth. I've worked with many people who have experienced this uniquely painful loss. This kind of grief is not only about the loss of your baby, but also the loss of all of your dreams for your child, the loss of the idea of what your family would look like, the loss of a part of you and your identity, and anything else your pregnancy meant to you. It takes as long as it takes to move through grief, so don't rush yourself.

— Kayce Hodos, Counselor in Wake Forest, NC

Grief work is a specialty of mine. We all get wounded in our family of origin. Some wounds we know about but most are either on a sub or unconscious level. In order to heal these wounds, the easiest way is to follow the grief we feel inside. The tools we use are Feelings and Intuition. This allows us to enter our "Inner World". We can follow our grief into our teen, adolescent, childhood and early childhood years. That's how we can heal those wounds. A Master Therapist can help you navigate.

— Robert Teister, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Ballard, WA
 

For Highly Sensitive people, grief sticks around longer, losses are more difficult to get over. It can feel like there is something wrong with you for not being able to move on in the same way as your friends. There is nothing wrong with you. Healing is possible.

— Bronwyn Shiffer, Clinical Social Worker in Madison, WI

No matter the loss, it is important to know your grief is individual. We will explore styles of grief, factors which impact our loss experience, secondary losses, coping skills, and finding a new normal.

— Monica Cagayat, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Bothell, WA
 

Grief/Loss journey is as unique as each individual experiencing the loss. Grief/Loss impacts our friendships, relationships, jobs, homes, churches, communities and so much more. A loss affects each of us differently as well as the way we express and grieve that loss. None of us should be held to a time frame of when we should be over our loss. I would be honored to assist you in your time of grief and loss to assist you along your journey to healing.

— Donna Groves, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Evansville, IN

Few people understand what it is like to grieve and most prefer avoiding the topic all together or give unsolicited advice. You may be feeling alone and sense that others are uncomfortable or inpatient when you discuss your feelings. I provide a space where you can relax, learn about, process and express your feelings freely without judgment. It can be a great relief to have someone who understands personally and professionally what grief and loss is like.

— Kaijah Bjorklund, Counselor in Ashland, OR
 

I spent two years providing grief and loss support to individuals and families in the hospital. I then facilitated grief and loss groups for middle school students and adults dealing with addiction, and have worked individually with adults, teens, and children dealing with grief and loss. I have presented professionally on grief and loss.

— Margaret Keig, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Orlando, FL

Losing a loved one can be one of the most devastating experiences of your life. The feelings of loneliness and despair can be overwhelming. Through focused work on grief and loss, we can work together to process the intense emotions while helping you move forward without feeling like you have to "just move on."

— Jennifer Hughes, Psychologist in , TX
 

Change is the only constant, and everything must change. Which is hard. Because whereas change is good, loss is painful. Let me guide you through the process of accepting your loss. Loved ones and pets leave a hole in our lives and we are never the same. We will look at the meaning of loss in your life as well as explore unexpected feelings that may be arising.

— christine loeb, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Encino, CA

Death Loss, Alzheimer's, Caregiving, End of Life, Miscarriage, Parenting after Loss, Caring for Aging Parents, Anticipatory Grief, Life Limiting Illness, Cancer Diagnosis.

— Heili Lehr, Counselor in Northglenn, CO
 

-ACT as well as finding rituals to confront and honor and grief and loss. -Trained as an End of Life Doula -2022 President of Northwest Association for Death Education and Bereavement Services.

— Chris Lombardo, Licensed Professional Counselor in ,

Most people will experience some sort of loss at one point in their lives. Grief is a reaction to any form of loss. Grief involves a range of emotions and reactions and is experienced differently by everyone. Grief counseling helps to emotionally prepare you for the anticipated passing of a loved one, help you manage feelings and reactions to a death or loss of significance and support you during the process of healing and acceptance.

— Daria Stepanian, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist
 

I have previous experience in working as a bereavement coordinator. This means I have walked along families as they went through the process of making arrangements for the loss of a loved one. Though that is my prior experience, I also believe that you can have grief and loss in a myriad of different forms and that all are worth exploring. Whether that be a physical loss of a loved one, the loss of job, the grief of a hard transition, or of unmet expectations. All are worthy of tender care.

— Jessie Murray, Counselor in SeaTac, WA

Many clients find me by searching for support after a miscarriage or stillbirth. I've worked with many people who have experienced this uniquely painful loss. This kind of grief is not only about the loss of your baby, but also the loss of all of your dreams for your child, the loss of the idea of what your family would look like, the loss of a part of you, and the loss of your expectations for your pregnancy. It takes as long as it takes to move through grief, so don't rush yourself.

— Kayce Hodos, Counselor in Wake Forest, NC
 

Bereavement matters is not a one size fits all. Sessions are tailored to meet you where you're at. We'll look at the emotional, mental, and physical impact of the loss and how it's impacting you. We'll also look at loss and grief in a meaningful way to move forward with your new way of being.

— Kimberly V Yates, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Valhalla, NY

I completed my entire counseling training working within the cancer/chronic illness field and continue to do so. Grief and loss is an essential part of a process and have supported hundreds of people through the grieving process as they lose a loved one or grief the loss of the life that has changed.

— Jill Gray, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in St. Petersburg, FL
 

Therapy with me is informed by my five years spent as a hospice social worker and extensive grief and loss training. I help people deal with their grief or loss in any way they need and I understand that my clients are the expert of their own grief and loss experiences. They know nothing is off-limits, no thought or feeling will be judged, that this is a safe place to get it all out.

— Kathleen McHugh Akbar, Licensed Clinical Social Worker