Mindfulness-based Therapy

Mindfulness-based approaches to therapy lead with mindfulness, promoting the practice as an important part of good mental health. Mindfulness is the psychological process of bringing one's attention to the internal and external experiences occurring in the present moment, which can be developed through the practice of meditation and other training. Simply put, mindfulness encourages and teaches us to fully live in the present moment. Through the practice of mindfulness we can learn to be present with our thoughts, emotions, relationships, and problems – and the more present we are, the more workable they become. It’s not about “positive thinking,” – it’s about not taking negative thoughts so seriously. Think this approach might be right for you? Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s mindfulness-based therapy experts today.

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Mindfulness Self Compassion Coaching This path explores a deeper aspect of yourself, The mindfulness approach has a large psychoeducational aspect along with weekly meditation assignments related to your goals. In our sessions we will discuss your mediation or mindfulness assignment, I will have teaching to share and then discuss how you can and did apply these skills to YOUR life. We still have your goals and concerns we address weekly or biweekly.

— Christina Spinler, Psychotherapist in Tulsa, OK

Mindfulness-based therapy can be a pretty broad term, so I'll share a little about how I use mindfulness. I focus in particular on mindful self-compassion, which means that I help you face your emotions with more support, warmth, and encouragement. This is important because often we learn to avoid our emotions, feel frustrated or ashamed by them, and might try to suppress or deny their existence.

— Ashley Hamm, Licensed Professional Counselor in Houston, TX
 

I use an eclectic approach that includes mindfulness-based framework and solution focused treatment. I also integrate some CBT, DBT and insight-oriented treatment.

— Deb Horton, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Deerfield, NH

Is about learning how to being more mindful about how a person treats themselves and how they go through life. It is about reconnecting to the present moment and how to be compassionate and in acceptance of oneself.

— Celine Redfield, Marriage & Family Therapist in Portland, OR
 

I have a 20 year mindfulness meditation practice that I bring with me to my clinical practice. My training placed a large emphasis on the benefits of a meditation practice, not only to the practitioner (therapist), but also to their clients. I use this approach to help my clients become more aware of their thoughts and bodily sensations, and the connection between them.

— Alejandro Rodriguez, Mental Health Counselor in Lake Mary, FL

Mindfulness-based approaches to therapy lead with mindfulness, promoting the practice as an important part of good mental health. Mindfulness is the psychological process of bringing one's attention to the internal and external experiences occurring in the present moment, which can be developed through the practice of meditation and other training. Simply put, mindfulness encourages and teaches us to fully live in the present moment with with our thoughts, emotions, relationships, and problems.

— Colby Schneider, Marriage and Family Therapist Associate in Portland, OR
 

I have received training and certification in conducting Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBTC) and find it a wonderful compliment to CBT. Even after we learn to identify patterns of distorted thinking, they don’t simply go away. You’ll use MBTC techniques to help you distance yourself from these self-defeating thoughts and disempower them. You’ll learn the vital skill of emotional self-regulation, and you’ll develop a kinder, less judgmental way of seeing yourself.

— Stephanie Clark, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Tampa, FL

Using mindfulness (incl. meditation, somatic, and sensorimotor psychotherapy techniques), I can help you improve your relationship to your body and internal world, tolerate sensations, and strengthen self-awareness - i.e. internal dialogues, thoughts, images, sensations, feelings. Practicing listening to your body and focusing on the now can help relieve tension, work through psychological and physiological discomfort, and heal trauma.

— Krystal Ying, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Santa Rosa, CA

Self-awareness is the cornerstone for therapy and change, and it is like a muscle - you need to build it! I have found mindfulness exercises helpful in this regard in addition to its benefits in stress-reduction, being present, and approaching difficult emotions. I have a certification in mindfulness-based stress reduction through Palouse Mindfulness and completed the course Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Anxiety at Boston University School of Social Work.

— Rachel Oppenheimer, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in Boston, MA
 

I assess and treat people based on a biopsychcosocial and spiritual model. Mindfulness-based therapy is another tool for coping with the stress and challenges brought on with aging, death/dying, chronic health/pain issues, grief/ loss and life transitions. Mindfulness-based therapy provides useful, daily coping skills and exercises that help manage feelings of depression, anxiety or unhappiness as well as preventing future onsets of discontent.

— Tanya Witman, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Colorado Springs, CO

What we pay attention to shapes our experience. By working with my clients to notice their minds, their attention, they work with attention and mindfulness to show improvements in mental health and wellness outcomes, feel more equipped to manage stressful or anxiety-provoking events, and are able to more adaptively manage unwanted sensations between session.

— Joey Salvatore, Counselor in Bethesda, MD
 

Mindfulness asks us to focus on the present moment intentionally and without judgement. This present oriented focus can be very helpful when working to develop new patterns of thinking and behavior. I often work with clients to develop mindfulness, in conjunction with other therapeutic techniques, to help address problems and concerns from a holistic perspective.

— Brittany Hopkins, Licensed Professional Counselor in Atlanta, GA

I have practiced mindfulness for years, and have watched it create waves of positive change throughout my life and the lives of my clients. I focus on concrete ways to bring this buzzword to life in the lives of real people - no daily meditation practice or lengthy amounts of time required if that's not your style. I can help you implement powerful moments of mindfulness into the busiest of lives.

— Anne Brady, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Columbus, OH
 

I've been using mindfulness as a therapeutic tool since I first started working with clients. I incorporate awareness of self into all of the therapy that I do, providing a space for clients to slow down and listen to themselves and others. I believe that being curious instead of judgmental about the what and how of an experience, including our physical reactions, allows us to gain valuable insight for healing. I've also taught other clinicians how to use these methods in couples therapy.

— Lee Padden, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in Temecula, CA

I invite clients to practice engaging thoughts, feelings, and life experiences with increased curiosity, awareness and compassion, including building skills for recognizing and processing emotional/somatic experiences. We notice habitual patterns, practice shifting those patterns in ways that do not cause additional suffering, and consider ways to cultivate desired experiences. This may include (but does not always include) engaging in breathing exercises, meditation practice, and grounding.

— Dr. Luana Bessa, Psychologist in Boston, MA
 

As mindfulness is becoming more and more mainstream, it has been incorporated into many professional trainings. I have been able to receive specific training on the uses of mindfulness during my trauma-informed yoga certification training, and use it frequently in sessions, for a variety of indications.

— Allison Staiger, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Metairie, LA