Self-Esteem

The term self-esteem refers to our overall subjective emotional evaluation of our own worth – in other words, it’s your attitude towards yourself. Self-esteem begins to take shape in childhood and can be influenced by many factors, including early experiences at home or school, familial relationships, the media, your age and role in society and how people react to you. It is totally normal for your self-esteem to fluctuate – for example feeling down about yourself once in awhile. However, most individuals develop a baseline self-esteem that remains fairly constant over the course of their lifetimes. If you are struggling with low self-esteem, you likely spend significant time criticizing yourself and you may experience frequent feelings of shame and self-doubt. The good news is that, with work, you can change your baseline self-esteem. Therapy for self-esteem issues can help you work toward feeling confident, valuable, and worthy of respect. Reach out to one of TherapyDen’s self-esteem experts today.

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Self Esteem or self worth may be a part of trauma, other disorders such as anxiety or depression or personality disorders. My work here is to help people change the way they think and talk to themselves about who they are. Typically, I use an ACT approach for this combined with looking at how a person's belief's about themselves evolved. It can take some time to change someone's self worth, though early in the process, learning some tools can help get things started.

— Patricia Ellis Christensen, Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in , CA

Specializing in treating Individuals of all ages struggling with low self-esteem, people pleasing behaviors, and difficulty setting personal boundaries.

— Jamee Leichtle, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor in Denver, CO
 

Anxious thoughts and difficult life experiences can cause us to doubt ourselves and the people we want to trust. Navigating relationships, whether they be romantic, friendships, work-related, or family, can create immense stress and anxiety. Life experiences may bring us pain, cause us to question our world, and create obstacles that feel overwhelming and overpowering. Together, we will come to a greater understanding of your inner struggles and needs and develop tools.

— Colorado Experiential Counseling, Licensed Professional Counselor in Colorado Springs, CO

To improve self-esteem, I will help you learn how to trust your gut and really pay attention to what is happening inside of you. Our intuition is often referred to as our “inner voice” most commonly known as a gut feeling. Body Psychotherapy & Embodied Spirituality utilize the body as a compass along with visualization and mindfulness, to create healthy boundaries in your relationships, so that you have space to manifest how you want to be in the world, and heal negative thinking patterns.

— Lina Návar, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX
 

Developing acceptance, compassion, and kindness towards ourselves is a lifelong practice. The person we have the most conversations with throughout our lifetime is ourselves and it is worth examining what those conversations regularly look and feel like. I work with clients to cultivate their strengths, find acceptance for the unique person that they are, and develop a sense of congruence. By examining our own narratives and where they come from we can change our story for the better.

— Dan Schmitt, Licensed Professional Counselor in Eugene, OR

Together we'll work on you realizing that people admire you because you are an AMAZING individual! You have many admirable qualities and everyone around you notices that. We just have to work together to remind you of how great you are! You'll realize that you’re not an imposter. You worked hard to get to where you’re at. You’ve earned all the good things that life has presented you with by showcasing the knowledge and capabilities you posses. In therapy, you’ll realize that you are worthy!

— Darryon Spencer, Licensed Mental Health Counselor
 

Therapy and changing our beliefs, behavior, and how we think about ourselves can raise our self-esteem. I use a 'person-centered' approach when it comes to address issues with self-worth - meaning that we work from the inside out. Additionally I use CBT, ACT, and mindfulness-based approaches to address these concerns so you recognize and change the core beliefs that get in the way of building confidence.

— Brionna Yanko, Psychotherapist in Denver, CO

Self Esteem encompasses so many areas of our lives...communication, relating, making plans/goals in our close relationships and in our communities of work, family and play. I am certified in Brene\' Brown\'s curriculum of Shame Resilience to help us sort out the details and live our fuller and happier life. Our self esteem drives the directions we go and finding ways to increase it's health can only help us. I am empathetic and supportive as we identify challenges and find solutions.

— Audrianna Gurr, Licensed Professional Counselor in Portland, OR
 

Self-esteem and confidence are often underlying issues that can deeply affect a person's ability to succeed and move forward in life. Issues with self-esteem typically stem from negative core beliefs that develop during childhood and adolescence. Using CBT and Mindfulness, I help clients to identify and challenge these negative self-thoughts in order to ease their distress and anxiety.

— Stef Stone, Therapist in Chicago, IL

Many of us struggle with our self-esteem. We often have negative self talk and see ourselves as imperfect. I believe that most healing starts with forgiving and accepting yourself as a perfectly imperfect human being. You are worthy of love, respect and care just as you are, right now. My clients have benefitted from my ability to help them make peace with their inner self. I create a calm, relaxed environment where they can be safe to express themselves honestly.

— Katie Robey, Associate Clinical Social Worker in Los Gatos, CA
 

As we go about our lives, we have thoughts and experiences that can shape how we view ourselves. Over time, if we find ourselves feeling devalued, invisible, or unworthy, our actions will follow as such. These actions can then either continue the lowering of our self-esteem or maintain it. My goal is to help you challenge automatic thoughts and the choices we make in a way that allows the healing process to begin. I want you to be able to find value and purpose within yourself.

— Dylan Lawson, Mental Health Counselor in Brooklyn, NY

Our beliefs in ourselves shape our lives. This is influenced by our upbringing and society. Once we internalize this, it can be hard to shake. Together, we can learn about how to separate from these thoughts and reconnect compassionately toward your strengths, growth and what matters to you.

— Jonathan Vargas, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in New York, NY
 

Whether its racial, cultural, gender, sexual orientation, or even work/career - you might be feeling overwhelmed with trying to figure yourself out. I can help you make better sense of yourself, develop deep self-compassion, and move through identity integration. Let’s get into some radical self-love practices and celebrate who you are!

— Jackie Jacobo, Associate Professional Clinical Counselor in San Diego, CA

Self-esteem refers to a person's overall sense of their own worth, value, and confidence. It reflects how a person feels about themselves and their abilities, and it plays a significant role in shaping their thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Self-esteem is a crucial component of mental and emotional well-being, influencing various aspects of a person's life, including their relationships, career, and overall quality of life. Healthy self-esteem is essential for mental and emotional well-being.

— Thomas Wood, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Bayside, WI
 

To improve self-esteem, I will help you learn how to trust your gut and really pay attention to what is happening inside of you. Our intuition is often referred to as our “inner voice” most commonly known as a gut feeling. Body Psychotherapy & Embodied Spirituality utilize the body as a compass along with visualization and mindfulness, to create healthy boundaries in your relationships, so that you have space to manifest how you want to be in the world, and heal negative thinking patterns.

— Lina Návar, Licensed Professional Counselor in Austin, TX

You feel like a mess, full of insecurities and indecision.  It’s even hard for you to take a compliment.  The voice in your head is your worst critic.  You know it’s time to do something about your low self esteem. I use a combination of exploring the root causes of your low self esteem and practical strategies to employ immediately so you can strengthen your self-confidence/  self-esteem, and begin developing the life you are capable of having and deserve.

— Jon Waller, Licensed Mental Health Counselor in Fort Lauderdale, FL