Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a chronic and long-lasting anxiety disorder in which a person has uncontrollable, reoccurring thoughts (obsessions) and behaviors (compulsions) that he or she feels driven to do repetitively. People with OCD may have symptoms of obsessions, compulsions, or both. Common activities include things like hand washing, counting of things, and checking to see if a door is locked over and over. Obsessive thoughts might center around thinks like an excessive concern about germs or forbidden sexual or religious thoughts. As opposed to people with “bad habits” or “negative thoughts”, symptoms of OCD can’t be controlled for more than a short period of time and typically interfere with school, work and personal relationships. People with OCD typically spend at least an hour a day on obsessive thoughts or behaviors. OCD is a serious condition and is associated with an increased risk of suicide. If you are suffering from OCD (or think you might be), reach out to one of TherapyDen’s OCD specialists today. 

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Meet the specialists

 

I have completed specialized OCD training with the Behavior Therapy Training Institute which is affiliated with the International OCD Foundation. I have experience with treating different subtypes of OCD including unwanted sexual thoughts, harm obsessions, contamination obsessions, health obsessions, and relationship obsessions.

— Anna Cross, Licensed Professional Counselor

Having struggled with OCD myself as a child, I was very excited to have the opportunity to receive training and experience in evidence-based treatment for OCD at UCSF in San Francisco. I therefore made it one of the specialties of my private practice to offer ERP and CBT for OCD. I also incorporate Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and am beginning to incorporate inference based therapy approaches which are emerging as another option to treat OCD.

— Ursula Steck, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in SAN FRANCISCO, CA
 

OCD is treatable and it is our goal to get OCD into full remission. We provide you with expert, high-quality and personalized treatment. Sessions will be conducted with a PhD-level psychologist, trained in highly-ranked programs with over 15 years of experience. Specializing exclusively in the treatment of OCD in adult women allows us to focus 100% on the latest knowledge and highly-effective techniques that will likely work best for you. We specialize in all subtypes of OCD.

— North Shore OCD Women's Treatment Center, Ltd. Kathi Fine Abitbol, PhD, Clinical Psychologist in Deerfield, IL

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) can be a very debilitating set of symptoms and is something for which I use a therapy called Exposure and Response Prevention (ExRP or ERP). This therapy is widely considered to be the most effective treatment for OCD available. I will teach you how to approach situations that create obsessive thinking and emotional distress and how to simultaneously resist acting on urges to engage in your compulsive behavior. Clients are often amazed at the results.

— Joe Groninga, Psychologist in St. Paul, MN
 

In working with OCD, I do a deep assessment related to the onset of your obsessive rumination and compulsive behaviors or mental rituals to break the cycle of feeling like you are on a constant hamster wheel you can't exit. I utilize a blend of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Exposure Response Prevention collaborating with you to treat your OCD. You will likely be working on constructing a hierarchy of feared events so we can develop exposure activities to help you overcome your anxiety.

— Tera Lensegrav-Benson, Psychologist in , UT

I have specialized training and supervision in Exposure and Response Prevention (ERP), the gold standard treatment for OCD. I also integrate Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) techniques into my treatment approach for OCD.

— Amy DiVincenzo, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Indianapolis, IN
 

OCD is treatable and it is our goal to get OCD into full remission. We specialize in all subtypes of OCD. We provide you with expert, high-quality and personalized treatment. Sessions will be conducted with a PhD-level psychologist, trained in highly-ranked programs with over 15 years of experience. Dr. Fine will be a speaker at the 2022 International OCD Foundation conference.

— North Shore OCD Women's Treatment Center, Ltd. Kathi Fine Abitbol, PhD, Clinical Psychologist in Deerfield, IL

I use a highly effective, evidence-based treatment for OCD called Exposure & Response Prevention Therapy (ERP). I have extensive experience and quality training in the use of ERP, and I have supported many clients in decreasing their OCD symptoms, improving their quality of life, and learning specific skills to manage uncertainty and anxiety.

— Natasha Moharter, Counselor in , CA
 

I utilize a CBT approach by understanding the client's thoughts behind each compulson. I have them create a list of their compulsions and obsessive thoughts so they can better understand how prominent the OCD is in their life, and what it looks like as a whole. I work with them to identify the trigger, thought, or situation provoking their OCD. I utilize a variety of different worksheets, exercises, and techniques to challenge, cope with, and decrease the OCD prevalence.

— Brittany Bergersen, Mental Health Counselor in Brooklyn, NY

I am experienced in providing Rumination-Focused Exposure and Response Prevention, a practical and achievable pathway to healing from OCD. I offer a specialized treatment program and rate for these services.

— Jonathan Benko, Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Santa Cruz, CA
 

In working with OCD, I do a deep assessment related to the onset of your obsessive rumination and compulsive behaviors or mental rituals to break the cycle of feeling like you are on a constant hamster wheel you can't exit. I utilize a blend of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Exposure Response Prevention collaborating with you to treat your OCD. You will likely be working on constructing a hierarchy of feared events so we can develop exposure activities to help you overcome your anxiety.

— Tera Lensegrav-Benson, Psychologist in , UT

We treat Perinatal/Postpartum/Maternal OCD, providing moms-to-be and new moms who are suffering with OCD symptoms effective treatment. We treat both maternal themes, such as an intense fear of harming or contaminating your infant, as well as any other subtype of OCD during pregnancy and postpartum. Should any OCD symptoms persist after the perinatal period, we continue to provide care to our clients throughout the entirety of their OCD treatment journey.

— North Shore OCD Women's Treatment Center, Ltd. Kathi Fine Abitbol, PhD, Clinical Psychologist in Deerfield, IL
 

Common themes in OCD include: contamination, unwanted sexual thoughts (forbidden or perverse sexual thoughts or images, sexual impulses about others, sexual obsessions that involve children or incest, obsessions about aggressive sexual behavior towards others), losing control (fear of acting on an impulse to harm oneself, to harm others, horrific images in one’s mind or blurting out obscenities or insults), religion, harm, and perfectionism.

— Theresa C., Licensed Clinical Social Worker in Seattle, WA

OCD is treatable and it is our goal to get OCD into full remission. We provide you with expert, high-quality and personalized treatment. Sessions will be conducted with a PhD-level psychologist, trained in highly-ranked programs with over 15 years of experience. Specializing exclusively in the treatment of OCD in adult women allows us to focus 100% on the latest knowledge and highly-effective techniques that will likely work best for you. We specialize in all subtypes of OCD.

— North Shore OCD Women's Treatment Center, Ltd. Kathi Fine Abitbol, PhD, Clinical Psychologist in Deerfield, IL
 

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is a persistent and intense type of anxiety, which often leads people to engage in behaviors they wish to change. My approach in treating OCD is to recognize the patterns and histories of symptoms, then find ways to interrupt them. I utilize a combination of acceptance- and exposure-oriented strategies to interrupt the cycle of obsessive thoughts and compulsive behavior.

— Robert Ortega, Psychologist in Washington, DC